Understanding patient health-seeking behaviour to optimise the uptake of cataract surgery in rural Kenya, Zambia and Uganda: findings from a multisite qualitative study

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Understanding patient health-seeking behaviour to optimise the uptake of cataract surgery in rural Kenya, Zambia and Uganda: findings from a multisite qualitative study


JournalInternational Health
Article typeJournal research article – Clinical research
Publication date – Sep – 2021
Authors – Stevens Bechange, Emma Jolley, Patrick Tobi, Eunice Mailu, Juliet Sentongo, Titamenji Chulu, Maurice Abony, Moses Chege, Glenda Mulenga, Johnson Ngorok, Tesfaye Adera, Elena Schmidt
Keywordsaccess to eye care, Cataract surgery, health system, health-seeking behaviour, Sub-Saharan Africa, uptake of services
Open access – Yes
SpecialityHealth policy, Ophthalmology
World region Eastern Africa, Southern Africa
Country: Kenya, Uganda, Zambia
Language – English
Submitted to the One Surgery Index on October 4, 2021 at 4:00 am
Abstract:

Background
Cataract is a major cause of visual impairment globally, affecting 15.2 million people who are blind, and another 78.8 million who have moderate or severe visual impairment. This study was designed to explore factors that influence the uptake of surgery offered to patients with operable cataract in a free-of-charge, community-based eye health programme.

Methods
Focus group discussions and in-depth interviews were conducted with patients and healthcare providers in rural Zambia, Kenya and Uganda during 2018–2019. We identified participants using purposive sampling. Thematic analysis was conducted using a combination of an inductive and deductive team-based approach.

Results
Participants consisted of 131 healthcare providers and 294 patients. Two-thirds of patients had been operated on for cataract. Two major themes emerged: (1) surgery enablers, including a desire to regain control of their lives, the positive testimonies of others, family support, as well as free surgery, medication and food; and (2) barriers to surgery, including cultural and social factors, as well as the inadequacies of the healthcare delivery system.

Conclusions
Cultural, social and health system realities impact decisions made by patients about cataract surgery uptake. This study highlights the importance of demand segmentation and improving the quality of services, based on patients’ expectations and needs, as strategies for increasing cataract surgery uptake.

OSI Number – 21276

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