Travel barriers, unemployment, and external fixation predict loss to follow-up after surgical management of lower extremity fractures in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

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Travel barriers, unemployment, and external fixation predict loss to follow-up after surgical management of lower extremity fractures in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania


Journalopen access journal of Orthopedic trauma
Publication date – Mar – 2020
Authors – Patterson, Joseph T. MD, Albright, Patrick D. BS, MS, Jackson, J. Hunter BA, Eliezer, Edmund N. MD, Haonga, Billy T. MD, Morshed, Saam MD, MPH, PhD, Shearer, David W. MD, MPH
Keywordsclinical trial; femur; loss to follow-up; low-income country; orthopaedic trauma; secondary analysis; Tanzania; tibia
Open access – Yes
SpecialityTrauma and orthopaedic surgery, Trauma surgery
World region Eastern Africa
Country: Tanzania
Language – English
Submitted to the One Surgery Index on May 29, 2020 at 1:13 pm
Abstract:

Objective:
Predict loss to follow-up in prospective clinical investigations of lower extremity fracture surgery.

Design:
Secondary analysis of 2 prospective clinical trials.

Setting:
National public orthopaedic and neurologic trauma tertiary referral hospital in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, a low-income country in sub-Saharan Africa.

Patients/Participants:
Three hundred twenty-nine femoral shaft and 240 open tibial shaft fracture patients prospectively enrolled in prospective controlled trials of surgical fracture management by external fixation, plating, or intramedullary nailing between June 2015 and March 2017.

Intervention:
Telephone contact for failure to attend scheduled 1-year clinic visit.

Main Outcome Measurements:
Ascertainment of primary trial outcome at 1-year from surgery; post-hoc telephone questionnaire for reasons patient did not attend the 1-year clinic visit.

Results:
One hundred twenty-seven femur fracture (39%) and 68 open tibia fracture (28%) patients did not attend the 1-year clinic visit. Telephone contact significantly improved ascertainment of the primary study outcome by 20% between 6-month and 1-year clinic visits to 82% and 92% respectively at study completion. Multivariable analysis associated unemployment (OR = 2.5 [1.7–3.9], P < .001), treatment with an external fixator (OR = 1.7 [1.0–2.8], P = .033), and each additional 20 km between residence and clinic (OR = 1.03 [1.00–1.06], P = .047] with clinic nonattendance. One hundred eight (55%) nonattending patients completed the telephone questionnaire, reporting travel distance to the hospital (49%), and travel costs to the hospital (46%) as the most prevalent reasons for nonattendance. Sixty-five percent of patients with open tibia fractures cited relocation after surgery as a contributing factor.

Conclusions:
Relocation during recovery, travel distance, travel cost, unemployment, and use of an external fixator are associated with loss to clinical follow-up in prospective investigations of femur and open tibia fracture surgery in this population. Telephone contact is an effective means to assess outcome.

OSI Number – 20448

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