The spectrum and burden of in-patient paediatric musculoskeletal diseases in Northern Tanzania

LATEST ARTICLES
SEARCH INDEX
SUGGEST ARTICLE
THE OSI COLLECTIONS
AUDIOGRAM SERIES
ABOUT THE OSI
2020 SUMMARY
2021 SUMMARY

OSI STATISTICS

Open access articles:
1358
Annotations added:
3
Countries represented:
117
No. of contributors:
13
Bookmarks made:
25

The spectrum and burden of in-patient paediatric musculoskeletal diseases in Northern Tanzania


JournalPaediatrics and International Child Health
Article typeJournal research article – Clinical research
Publication date – Apr – 2022
Authors – Rebecca B. Walsh, Anthony Mwingwa, Nateiya M. Yongolo, Sanjura M. Biswaro, Manasseh Joel Mwanswila, Clive Kelly, Blandina T. Mmbaga, Faith Mosha, William K. Gray, Emma McIntosh, Richard W. Walker show
KeywordsPaediatric musculoskeletal disease, patient admissions, sub-Saharan Africain
Open access – Yes
SpecialityPaediatric surgery
World region Eastern Africa
Country: Tanzania
Language – English
Submitted to the One Surgery Index on May 3, 2022 at 11:57 pm
Abstract:

Background
Musculoskeletal diseases (MSD) are a major contributor to the global burden of disease and disability, and disproportionally affect low- and middle-income countries; however, there is a dearth of epidemiological data. Affected children often face increased morbidity, social isolation and economic hardship.

Aim
To assess the spectrum and burden of paediatric MSD in children aged 5–18 years admitted to a major referral hospital in Tanzania.

Methods
This was a retrospective cohort study of children aged 5–18 years admitted to Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre (KCMC) whose initial diagnosis was recognised as a musculoskeletal condition by the International Classification of Diseases-10 between 1 January and 31 December 2017.

Results
During 2017, 163 cases of confirmed paediatric MSD were admitted to KCMC, representing 21.2% of all admissions of children aged 5–18 years (n = 769). Bone disease was the most common diagnosis. They comprised 106 (65.0%) traumatic fractures, 31 (19.0%) osteo-articular infections, 9 (5.5%) malunions and 3 (1.8%) pathological fractures. Congenital defects and rheumatic disease were relatively uncommon, accounting for only 6 (3.7%) and 4 (2.5%) MSD admissions, respectively.

Conclusion
The majority of cases of MSD were related to fractures, followed by osteo-articular infections, while recognised cases of rheumatic disease were rare. The study, although small, identified the sizeable burden and spectrum of paediatric MSD admitted to a hospital in Tanzania over a 12-month period and highlights the need for larger studies to inform the optimal allocation of health resources.

OSI Number – 21588

Public annotations on this article:
No public annotations yet