The Role of Young Neurosurgeons in Global Surgery: A Unified Voice for Health Care Equity

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The Role of Young Neurosurgeons in Global Surgery: A Unified Voice for Health Care Equity


JournalJournal of Global Neurosurgery
Article typeJournal research article – Literature review
Publication date – Apr – 2021
Authors – Nqobile S. Thango , Ronnie E. Baticulon ,Elizabeth Ogando ,Faith C. Robertson ,Laura Lippa ,AngelosKolias ,Ignatius N. Esene , WFNS Young Neurosurgeons Committee
KeywordsHealth care equity, health policy, LMICs, Neurosurgery
Open access – Yes
SpecialityHealth policy, Neurosurgery
World region Global

Language – English
Submitted to the One Surgery Index on April 27, 2021 at 2:45 am
Abstract:

Health care equity pursues the elimination of health disparities or inequalities. One of the most significant challenges is the inequality shaped by policies, for which systemic change is needed. Historically, non-surgical pathologies have received greater political priority than surgical pathologies, but we have begun to see a paradigm shift over the past decade. In 2010, Shrime et al. showed that 32.9% of all global deaths were attributed to surgically related conditions, which equated to three times more deaths than that due to non-surgical pathologies such as tuberculosis, malaria, and HIV/AIDS combined (1). When the Lancet Commission on Global Surgery was published in 2015 (2), a new era in global health emerged. The message was clear: surgical diseases could no longer be neglected. The report emphasized the importance of systems-level improvements in service delivery, workforce training, financing, information management, infrastructure, health policy, and governance.

In neurosurgery, over five million patients present with treatable conditions each year but do not have access to surgical intervention (3). Most of these patients live in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), particularly in Africa and South-East Asia. For a hospital to offer neurosurgical services, substantial investment in infrastructure and human resources is required. Hence, most neurosurgical services tend to be concentrated in tertiary hospitals or academic centers located in cities or urban regions. Moreover, the comprehensive management of a patient’s neurosurgical disease relies heavily on a functioning health care system, often requiring a multidisciplinary team approach, whether in children or adults.

OSI Number – 21051

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