The Lancet NCDI Poverty Commission: bridging a gap in universal health coverage for the poorest billion

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The Lancet NCDI Poverty Commission: bridging a gap in universal health coverage for the poorest billion


JournalThe Lancet
Publication date – Sep – 2020
Authors – Gene Bukhman, Ana O Mocumbi, Rifat Atun, Anne E Becker, Zulfiqar Bhutta, Agnes Binagwaho, Chelsea Clinton, Matthew M Coates, Katie Dain, Majid Ezzati, Gary Gottlieb, Indrani Gupta, Neil Gupta, Adnan A Hyder, Yogesh Jain, Margaret E Kruk, Julie Makani, Andrew Marx, J Jaime Miranda, Ole F Norheim, Rachel Nugent, Nobhojit Roy, Cristina Stefan, Lee Wallis, Bongani Mayosi†, for the Lancet NCDI Poverty Commission Study Group
Keywordslancet commission, universal healthcare
Open access – Yes
SpecialityHealth policy
World region Global

Language – English
Submitted to the One Surgery Index on November 9, 2020 at 3:14 am
Abstract:

We live in an era of unprecedented global wealth. Nevertheless, about one billion people in low-income and lower-middle-income countries (LLMICs) still experience levels of poverty that have long been described as “beneath any reasonable definition of human decency”, in the words of former World Bank president, Robert McNamara. This Commission was formed at the end of 2015 in the conviction that non-communicable diseases and injuries (NCDIs) are an important, yet an under-recognised and poorly-understood contributor to the death and suffering of this vulnerable population. The aims of the Commission were to rethink global policies, mend a great disparity in health, and broaden the global health agenda in the interest of equity.

There are ways, with demonstrated effectiveness in real-world conditions, to address the constellation of afflictions known as NCDIs. We have found, however, that the world’s poorest billion are being systematically deprived of those life-saving and life-changing interventions. This unfair exclusion stems both from a lack of global solidarity with the poorest of the poor, and from inadequate descriptions and comprehension of the problem. NCDIs are commonly represented as complications of ageing and development. In fact, they also constitute a large and diverse burden of illness among children and young adults, who make up the largest proportion of people living in extreme poverty around the world. Public health discourse and global solutions have generally focused on preventing NCDIs through changes in human behaviours, and not on addressing the inadequate resources available for the poor to be properly nourished, live safely, and to access health care. Meanwhile, treatments for NCDIs account for the largest gap in health financing for LLMICs, making a mockery of international commitments to universal health coverage (UHC).

OSI Number – 20732

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