The implementation of a national paediatric oncology protocol for neuroblastoma in South Africa

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The implementation of a national paediatric oncology protocol for neuroblastoma in South Africa


JournalCancer Causes & Control
Article typeJournal research article – Clinical research
Publication date – Apr – 2021
Authors – Jaques van Heerden, Marc Hendricks, Janet Poole, Ané Büchner, Gita Naidu, Jan du Plessis, Barry van Emmenes, Anel van Zyl, Ronelle Uys, Johani Johani, G. P. Hadley, Derek Harrison, Biance Rowe, Mairi Bassingthwaighte, Nicolene Moonsamy , Mariana Kruger
KeywordsChildren Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research, National protocols, Neuroblastoma, South Africa
Open access – Yes
SpecialityNeurosurgery, Paediatric surgery, Surgical oncology
World region Southern Africa
Country: South Africa
Language – English
Submitted to the One Surgery Index on April 29, 2021 at 5:03 am
Abstract:

Purpose
The aim of the World Health Organization-International Paediatric Oncology Society is to improve childhood cancer survival in low- and middle-income countries to 60% by 2030. This can be achieved using standardised evidence-based national treatment protocols for common childhood cancers. The aim of the study was to describe the development and implementation of the SACCSG NB-2017 neuroblastoma (NB) treatment protocol as part of the treatment harmonisation process of the South African Children’s Cancer Study Group.

Methods
The Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research was used to identify factors that could influence the implementation of the national NB protocol as a health care intervention. The evaluation was done according to five interactive domains for implementation: intervention characteristics, inner setting, outer setting, individual or team characteristics and the implementation process.

Results
The protocol was developed over 26 months by 26 physicians involved in childhood cancer management. The process included an organisational phase, a resource identification phase, a development phase and a research ethics approval phase. Challenges included nationalised inertia, variable research ethical approval procedures with delays and uncoordinated clinical trial implementation.

Conclusion
The implementation of the national NB protocol demonstrated the complexity of the implementation of a national childhood cancer treatment protocol. However, standardised paediatric cancer treatment protocols based on local expertise and resources in limited settings are feasible

OSI Number – 21065

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