The impact of the Fundamental Critical Course on knowledge acquisition in Rwanda

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The impact of the Fundamental Critical Course on knowledge acquisition in Rwanda


JournalSouthern African Journal of Critical Care
Article typeJournal research article – Clinical research
Publication date – May – 2022
Authors – D Hopkinson, K Akuamoah-Boateng, P Banguti, J P Mvukiyehe, C Zerfoss, T Eng, E Tuyishime, K Hertel, D Starling, A Bethea, B Moses, A Syed
KeywordsEmerging critical care systems, Fundamental Critical Care Support (FCCS), Low-and middle-income countries, Sub-Saharan Africa
Open access – Yes
SpecialityCritical care
World region Central Africa, Eastern Africa
Country: Rwanda
Language – English
Submitted to the One Surgery Index on May 24, 2022 at 11:46 pm
Abstract:

Background. Emerging critical care systems have gained little attention in low- and middle-income countries. In sub-Saharan Africa, only 4% of the healthcare workforce is trained in critical care, and mortality rates are unacceptably high in this patient population.
Aim. We sought to retrospectively describe the knowledge acquisition and confidence improvement of practitioners who attend the Fundamental Critical Care Support (FCCS) course in Rwanda.
Methods. We conducted a retrospective study in which we assessed survey data and multiple-choice question data that were collected before and after course delivery. The purpose of these assessments at the time of delivery was to evaluate participants’ perception and acquisition of critical care knowledge.
Results. Thirty-six interprofessional clinicians completed the training. Performance on the multiple-choice questions improved overall after the course (mean score pre-course of 56.5% to mean score post-course of 65.8%,p-value <0.001) and improved in all content areas with the exception of diagnosis and management of acute coronary syndrome and acute respiratory failure/mechanical ventilation. Both physicians and nurses improved their scores significantly (68.9% to 75.6%,p-value = 0.031 and 52.0% to 63.5%,p-value <0.001, respectively). Self-reported
confidence in level of knowledge also increased in all areas. Survey respondents indicated on open-answer questions that they would like the course offerings at least annually, and that further dissemination of the course in Rwanda was warranted.
Conclusion. Deploying the established FCCS course improved Rwandan healthcare provider knowledge and confidence across most critical care content areas. Therefore, this course represents a good first step in bridging the gaps noted in emerging critical care systems.

OSI Number – 21617

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