The embodiment of low-field MRI for the diagnosis of infant hydrocephalus in Uganda

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The embodiment of low-field MRI for the diagnosis of infant hydrocephalus in Uganda


Journal2020 IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference (GHTC)
Article typeOther
Publication date – Nov – 2020
Authors – Jan Carel Diehl, Frank van Doesum, Martien Bakker, Martin van Gijzen, Thomas O’Reilly, Ivan Muhumuza, Johnes Obungoloch, Edith Mbabazi Kabachelor
Keywordsdesign for healthcare, health diagnostics, humancentred design., infant hydrocephalus, low resource settings, MRI, Uganda
Open access – Yes
SpecialityNeurosurgery, Other
World region Eastern Asia
Country: Uganda
Language – English
Submitted to the One Surgery Index on December 13, 2020 at 2:13 pm
Abstract:

Compared to other parts of the world, theincidence of hydrocephalus in children is very high in subSaharan Africa. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) would be the
preferred diagnostic method for infant hydrocephaleus. However, in practice, MRI is seldom used in sub-Saharan Africa due to its high prize, low mobility, and high power consumption.
A low-cost MRI technology is under development by reducing the strength of the magnetic field and the use of alternative technologies to create the magnetic field. This paper describes the embodiment design process to match this new MRI technology under development with the specific characteristics of the healthcare system in Uganda.

A context exploration was performed to identify factors that may affect the design and implementation of the low-field MRI in Ugandan hospitals and Ugandan healthcare environment. The key-insights from the technology- and context-exploration were translated into requirements which were the starting point for the design process. The concept development did have a focus on Cost-effective design, Design for durability & reliability, and Design for repairability. The final design was validated by stakeholders from the Ugandan Healthcare context.

OSI Number – 20799

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