Establishing collaborations in global neurosurgery: The role of InterSurgeon

The global deficiency in surgical care has been highlighted in the past several years, through the publication of the Lancet Commission on Global Surgery in 2015, the passage of WHA Resolution 68.15, and concerted efforts by advocacy organizations such as the G4 Alliance. Approximately 23,300 additional neurosurgeons are estimated to be needed to address the greater than 5 million essential neurosurgical cases that are not performed annually, most in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs).

However, increasing recognition of the ease and feasibility of virtual technology prompted a shift towards virtual modes of communication. InterSurgeon (https://www.intersurgeon.org/), an independent, internet-based social network platform, has allowed for formal connection between global surgery advocates who may have complementary needs and resources. This manuscript aims to: 1) characterize the current progress of InterSurgeon, 2) describe lessons learned from the creation and use of InterSurgeon, and 3) discuss future directions for InterSurgeon.

Equitable, well-designed collaborations are central to progress in global neurosurgery. InterSurgeon has catalyzed collaborations within global neurosurgery across world regions and country income status. In addition to its role in facilitating traditional in person collaborations, InterSurgeon will become an increasingly important tool for connecting surgeons worldwide as virtual collaboration and augmented reality training paradigms become important components of global surgery capacity building.

Communication Intervention Using Digital Technology to Facilitate Informed Choices at Childbirth in the Context of the COVID-19 Pandemic: Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial

Background:
In Brazil and other low- and middle-income countries, excess interventions in childbirth are associated with an increase in preterm and early-term births, contributing to stagnant morbidity and mortality of mothers and neonates. The fact that women often report a negative experience with vaginal childbirth, with physical pain and feelings of unsafety, neglect, or abuse, may explain the high acceptability of elective cesarean sections. The recognition of information needs and of the right to informed choice during childbirth can help change this reality. The internet has been the main source of health information, but its quality is highly variable.

Objective:
This study aimed to develop and evaluate an information and communication strategy through a smartphone app with respect to childbirth, to facilitate informed choices for access to safer and evidence-based care in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Methods:
A randomized controlled trial, with 2 arms (intervention and control) and a closed, blind, parallel design, will be conducted with a smartphone app designed for behavior and opinion research in Brazil, with women of reproductive age previously registered on the app. After completing an entry questionnaire to verify the eligibility criteria and obtaining ethical consent, approximately 20,000 participants will be randomly allocated to the intervention and control groups at a 1:1 ratio. Participants allocated to the intervention group will be invited to engage in a digital information and communication strategy, which is designed to expand evidence-based knowledge on the advantages and disadvantages of options for labor and childbirth and the safety of the care processes. The information is based on the guidelines of the Ministry of Health and the World Health Organization for a positive childbirth experience and has been updated to include the new challenges and disruptions in maternity care within the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. The control group will receive information regarding disposable and reusable diapers as a placebo intervention. The groups will be compared in their responses in generating the birth plan and the entry and exit questionnaires, regarding responses less or more aligned with the guidelines for a positive childbirth experience. A qualitative component to map information needs is included.

Results:
The digital trial started recruiting participants in late October 2020, and data collection has been projected to be complete by December 2020.

Conclusions:
This study will evaluate an innovative intervention that has the potential to promote better communication between women and providers, such that they can make better choices using an approach suitable for use during the COVID-19 pandemic

m-Health for Burn Injury Consultations in a Low-Resource Setting: An Acceptability Study Among Health Care Providers

Introduction:The rapid adoption of smartphones, especially in low- and middle-income countries, has opened up novel ways to deliver health care, including diagnosis and management of burns. This study was conducted to measure acceptability and to identify factors that influence health care provider’s attitudes toward m-health technology for emergency care of burn patients.

Methods:An extended version of the technology acceptance model (TAM) was used to assess the acceptability toward using m-health for burns. A questionnaire was distributed to health professionals at four hospitals in Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania. The questionnaire was based on several validated instruments and has previously been adopted for the sub-Saharan context. It measured constructs, including acceptability, usefulness, ease of use, social influences, and voluntariness. Univariate analysis was used to test our proposed hypotheses, and structural equation modeling was used to test the extended version of TAM.

Results:In our proposed test-model based on TAM, we found a significant relationship between compatibility—usefulness and usefulness—attitudes. The univariate analysis further revealed some differences between subgroups. Almost all health professionals in our sample already use smartphones for work purposes and were positive about using smartphones for burn consultations. Despite participants perceiving the application to be easy to use, they suggested that training and ongoing support should be available. Barriers mentioned include access to wireless internet and access to hospital-provided smartphones.