An assessment of orofacial clefts in Tanzania.

Clefts of the lip (CL), the palate (CP), or both (CLP) are the most common orofacial congenital malformations found among live births, accounting for 65% of all head and neck anomalies. The frequency and pattern of orofacial clefts in different parts of the world and among different human groups varies widely. Generally, populations of Asian or Native American origin have the highest prevalence, while Caucasian populations show intermediate prevalence and African populations the lowest. To date, little is known regarding the epidemiology and pattern of orofacial clefts in Tanzania.A retrospective descriptive study was conducted at Bugando Medical Centre to identify all children with orofacial clefts that attended or were treated during a period of five years. Cleft lip and/or palate records were obtained from patient files in the Hospital’s Departments of Surgery, Paediatrics and medical records. Age at presentation, sex, region of origin, type and laterality of the cleft were recorded. In addition, presence of associated congenital anomalies or syndromes was recorded.A total of 240 orofacial cleft cases were seen during this period. Isolated cleft lip was the most common cleft type followed closely by cleft lip and palate (CLP). This is a departure from the pattern of clefting reported for Caucasian and Asian populations, where CLP or isolated cleft palate is the most common type. The distribution of clefts by side showed a statistically significant preponderance of the left side (43.7%) (?2 = 92.4, p < 0.001), followed by the right (28.8%) and bilateral sides (18.3%). Patients with isolated cleft palate presented at very early age (mean age 1.00 years, SE 0.56). Associated congenital anomalies were observed in 2.8% of all patients with orofacial clefts, and included neural tube defects, Talipes and persistent ductus arteriosus.Unilateral orofacial clefts were significantly more common than bilateral clefts; with the left side being the most common affected side. Most of the other findings did not show marked differences with orofacial cleft distributions in other African populations.

[Place of double arthrodesis in the management of irreducible talipes equinovarus].

La prise en charge du pied bot varus équin invétéré ( PBVEI) pose d’énormes problèmes thérapeutiques. La double arthrodèse sous-talienne et médio-tarsienne longtemps considérée comme la solution de sécurité pour ces déformations est encore couramment utilisée. Nous rapportons une série de 13 enfants opérés pour un pied bot varus équin invétérés (16 pieds) par Arthrodèse sous-talienne et médio tarsienne réalisée au service d’orthopédie pédiatrique du CHU Hassan II ; de Fès au Maroc sur une période de 4 ans ; étalée de janvier 2009 à décembre 2012. L’âge moyen de nos patients était de 12,6 ans avec prédominance féminine. L’origine congénitale était retrouvée chez 10 patients. L’atteinte était gauche chez 8 patients avec une localisation bilatérale chez 3 patients. La radiographie standard du pied de face et de profil a révélée une divergence talo-calcanéenne qui variait entre 5 et 20°, l’angle talus-1er métatarsien entre 20 et 40° (avec une moyenne de 28°) et l’angle calcanéus-5ème métatarsien entre 15° et 45° (avec une moyenne de 30°). Tous les patients ont bénéficiés d’une arthrodèse sous-talienne et médio tarsienne. Les résultats étaient satisfaisants dans 98% des cas. Le pied était plantigrade dans 9 cas, le varus de l’arrière pied persistait dans 4 pieds alors que l’équin et le varus de l’avant pied étaient notés chez 2 cas. La double arthrodèse est l’intervention idéale pour stabiliser et corriger les déformations rencontrées dans le PBVE invétéré , elle assure totalement le verrouillage du couple de torsion. Elle permet outre une correction des diverses déformations et une ré-axation de l’arrière-pied dans les 3 plans de l’espace.

Operations for Suspected Neoplasms in a Resource-Limited Setting: Experience and Challenges in the Eastern Democratic of Congo.

Introduction
Surgery is an essential component of a functional health system, with surgical conditions accounting for nearly 11–15% of world disability. While communicable diseases continue to burden low- and low–middle-income countries, non-communicable diseases, such as cancer, are an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Preliminary data on malignancies in low- and middle-income countries, specifically in Africa, suggest a higher mortality compared to other regions of the world, a difference partially explained by limited availability of screening and early detection systems as well as poorer access to treatment.

Objective
To evaluate the diagnosed tumor burden in the Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and review literature on existing and suspected barriers to accessing appropriate oncologic care.

Methods
This is a retrospective study carried out at Healthcare, Education, community Action, and Leadership development Africa, a 197-bed tertiary referral hospital, in the Province of North Kivu, along the eastern border of the DRC from 2012 to 2015. Patient charts were reviewed for diagnoses of presumed malignancy with biopsy results.

Results
A total of 252 cases of suspected cancer were reviewed during the study period; 39.7% were men. The average age of patients was 43 years. Amongst adult patients, the most common presenting condition involved breast lesions with 5.8% diagnosis of fibrocystic breast changes and 2.9% invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast. 37.3% of female patients had lesions involving the cervix or uterus. The most common diagnosis amongst male adults was prostate disease (16.7% of men). For pediatric patients, the most common diagnoses involved bone and/or cartilage (27.3%) followed by skin and soft tissue lesions (20.0%). All patients underwent surgical resection of lesions; some patients were advised to travel out of country for chemotherapy and radiation for which follow-up data are unavailable.

Conclusion
Adequate and timely treatment of malignancy in the DRC faces a multitude of challenges. Access to surgical services for diagnosis and management as well as chemotherapeutic agents is prohibitively limited. Increased collaboration with local clinicians and remote specialist consultants is needed to deliver subspecialty care in resource-poor settings.

High Elective Surgery Cancellation Rate in Malawi Primarily Due to Infrastructural Limitations.

The provision of safe and timely surgical care is essential to global health care. Low- and middle-income countries have a disproportionate share of the global surgical disease burden and struggle to provide care with the given resources. Surgery cancellation worldwide occurs for many reasons, which are likely to differ between high-income and low-income settings. We sought to evaluate the proportion of elective surgery that is cancelled and the associated reasons for cancellation at a tertiary hospital in Malawi.This was a retrospective review of a database maintained by the Department of Anesthesiology at Kamuzu Central Hospital in Lilongwe, Malawi. Data were available from August 2011 to January 2015 and included weekday records for the number of scheduled surgeries, the number of cancelled surgeries, and the reasons for cancellation. Descriptive statistics were performed.Of 10,730 scheduled surgeries, 4740 (44.2%) were cancelled. The most common reason for cancellation was infrastructural limitations (84.8%), including equipment shortages (50.9%) and time constraints (33.3%). Provider limitations accounted for 16.5% of cancellations, most often due to shortages of anaesthesia providers. Preoperative medical conditions contributed to 26.3% of cancellations.This study demonstrates a high case cancellation rate at a tertiary hospital in Malawi, attributable primarily to infrastructural limitations. These data provide evidence that investments in medical infrastructure and prevention of workforce brain drain are critical to surgical services in this region.

Pattern of Lower Intestinal Ostomies in a Low-Income Country: Case of Southeast of Niger Republic.

Background
Intestinal ostomies are common surgical procedures performed in visceral surgery as part of management for several gastrointestinal diseases. This study aims to report the socio-demographic characteristics, indications and prognosis of intestinal ostomies in low-income country.

Methods
This was a 4-year retrospective study (January 2013 to December 2016) at Zinder National Hospital (Niger). All patients with a digestive ostomy on an ileum or colic segment were included in the study.

Results
During the study period, 2437 patients underwent digestive surgery, including 328 gastrointestinal stomas (13.5%). Patients classified ASA3 were 60.7% (n = 199). The median age was 12 years (IQ: 7–25). Children represent 64% (n = 210) of patients with ostomy. The sex ratio was 2.60. The stoma was performed in emergency in 96.3% (n = 316) of cases. Acute peritonitis was the main indication of the stoma in 70.73% (n = 232). The ileostomies accounted for 75.61% (n = 248). Ostomy was intended as temporary in 97.3% of cases (n = 319). Complications were observed in 188 patients (57.3%). Mortality was 14.02% (n = 46). The indigent status (OR: 4.15 [2.20–7.83], P = 000), ASA score 4 (OR: 2.53 [1.54–4.15], P = 0.0003), Altemeier class IV (OR: 4.03 [2.10–7.73], P = 0.0000) and ileostomy (OR: 2.7853 [1.47–5.29], P = 0.0018) were statistically associated with the occurrence of major complications. The mean time for stoma closure was 59.3 ± 14.5 days.

Conclusion
Acute peritonitis was the main indication of digestive ostomy. The occurrence of major complications was associated with bad socioeconomic status, ASA4 score, Altemeier class IV and ileostomy.

In-situ pinning for Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis in blacks: experience in a regional orthopaedic centre.

BACKGROUND:
Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis (SCFE) is the commonest pathology affecting the adolescent hip with an incidence of approximately 2 per 100,000 population. Blacks are more commonly affected than Caucasians. Of many treatment options available, in-situ-pinning appears to be the most widely employed.

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES:
To determine the epidemiological pattern and the outcome of in-situ pinning for slipped capital femoral epiphysis in Nigerian adolescents.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:
This is a six-year retrospective review of all the cases of slipped capital femoral epiphysis treated by in-situ pinning between 1st January 1998 and 31st December 2003 at the National Orthopaedic Hospital, Igbobi, Lagos, Nigeria.

RESULTS:
Thirty-one patients with 35 affected hips were managed with in-situ pinning during the period of review. Twenty-one females (67.7%) and 10 males (32.3%) with a F:M ratio of 2.1:1 were affected. The mean age for all the patients was 12.45 years (range 6 – 16; SD ± 1.79). The most common presenting complaint was hip pain seen in 48.4% of cases. Satisfactory results were obtained in 13 hips (37%) while the results in the remaining 22 hips were unsatisfactory. The most common complication was limb length discrepancy.

CONCLUSION:
This study shows that SCFE is not an uncommon condition in orthopaedic practice in Nigeria. The high rate of unsatisfactory results is associated with the severity of the slips and the unavailability of image intensifier at the time of surgery.

An assessment of orofacial clefts in Tanzania

BACKGROUND:
Clefts of the lip (CL), the palate (CP), or both (CLP) are the most common orofacial congenital malformations found among live births, accounting for 65% of all head and neck anomalies. The frequency and pattern of orofacial clefts in different parts of the world and among different human groups varies widely. Generally, populations of Asian or Native American origin have the highest prevalence, while Caucasian populations show intermediate prevalence and African populations the lowest. To date, little is known regarding the epidemiology and pattern of orofacial clefts in Tanzania.

METHODS:
A retrospective descriptive study was conducted at Bugando Medical Centre to identify all children with orofacial clefts that attended or were treated during a period of five years. Cleft lip and/or palate records were obtained from patient files in the Hospital’s Departments of Surgery, Paediatrics and medical records. Age at presentation, sex, region of origin, type and laterality of the cleft were recorded. In addition, presence of associated congenital anomalies or syndromes was recorded.

RESULTS:
A total of 240 orofacial cleft cases were seen during this period. Isolated cleft lip was the most common cleft type followed closely by cleft lip and palate (CLP). This is a departure from the pattern of clefting reported for Caucasian and Asian populations, where CLP or isolated cleft palate is the most common type. The distribution of clefts by side showed a statistically significant preponderance of the left side (43.7%) (χ2 = 92.4, p < 0.001), followed by the right (28.8%) and bilateral sides (18.3%). Patients with isolated cleft palate presented at very early age (mean age 1.00 years, SE 0.56). Associated congenital anomalies were observed in 2.8% of all patients with orofacial clefts, and included neural tube defects, Talipes and persistent ductus arteriosus.

CONCLUSIONS:
Unilateral orofacial clefts were significantly more common than bilateral clefts; with the left side being the most common affected side. Most of the other findings did not show marked differences with orofacial cleft distributions in other African populations.