Results of operative treatment of acetabular fractures from the Third World–how local factors affect the outcome.

The objective of this study was to assess the outcome of operations on acetabular fractures from a developing country in the presence of locally available facilities. Sixty-three acetabular fractures were assessed at an average follow up of 52.94 months after operation. Twenty-six patients operated upon in the first three years and 37 operated thereafter were separately studied to discover the effect of the learning curve. Regarding the fractures, 47 of 63 (74.6%) had excellent/good results (Harris Hip Score>80). The complications included broken drill bit in eight patients (12.69%), deep infection and heterotopic ossification in five patients (7.93%), avascular necrosis and sciatic nerve palsy in two patients (3.17%) and implant failure in one patient (1.58%). The results collected during the learning curve were inferior in the complex fractures (p value<0.001). Complications were common in patients opting for local implants and in those operated after over 2 weeks delay.

Developing a sustainable hip service in Cambodia

OBJECTIVE:
Initial report on establishment of a hip service in Phnom Penh, Cambodia at Children’s Surgical Centre. We describe indications for total hip replacement (THR) and initial results.

METHODS:
A database was established to collect data and track patients for follow up. Initial data collected included; diagnosis, implant used, post-operative complications. As the service developed, pre- and postoperative Harris hip scores were included.

RESULTS:
High rate of avascular necrosis (AVN) as the initial diagnosis. Five years post initiation of the hip service, 95 patients have received 116 THRs; including 10 revisions, 12 bilateral procedures. Complications/failures requiring revision involved four prosthetic femoral neck fractures, two aseptic acetabular component, two late infections, one instability. One failure, a periprosthetic acetabular fracture, required removal of all prosthetics. Complications not requiring revision, included three post-op foot drops, three superficial wound infections, one Vancouver B1 periprosthetic femur fracture. Average age was 41. Overall implant survival is 85% at three years.

DISCUSSION:
AVN was the most common indication for THR: many patients had a history of hip trauma, and/or prolonged steroids from traditional healers for pain. Problems with specific implants were addressed by the company. A different stem is now routinely used, no further fractures have been reported. Acetabular loosening, thought to be due to poor technique, has been addressed by focused training. Infection rate is monitored, and microbiology resources are improving.

CONCLUSION:
Developing an affordable hip arthroplasty service in a country like Cambodia is challenging. Developing a local registry has helped to identify complications and modify techniques.