Epidemiology of Surgical Amputations in Tamale Teaching Hospital, Ghana

The current study aimed to explore the details of surgical amputations in Tamale, Ghana. This was a retrospective descriptive study. We analyzed case files of 112 patients who underwent surgical amputations
between 2011 and 2017. Demographics, site of amputation, indication for amputation, and outcomes were
retrieved from case files. Descriptive statistics were used to report the means and frequencies. Associations
between variables were assessed using Chi-Square, ANOVA, and Student’s t-test. The mean age of the participants was 43.6±23.1 years (range 2 to 86). Most (64.3%) were males. Lower limb amputations accounted for most (78.6%) cases. Diabetic vasculopathy was the most prevalent indication (44.6%), followed by trauma (36.6%). The mean hospital stay was 30.1±22.4 days (range 5 to 120). Surgical site infection (17.9%) was the main complication. In our study setting, there is thus far limited capability for proper management of diabetes mellitus, which needs to be improved. There is also an urgent need for multidisciplinary foot care teams that will help patients receive comprehensive care to reduce complications from diabetes and other vasculopathies

Long-term mortality after lower extremity amputation: A retrospective study at a second-level government hospital in Cape Town, South Africa

Background:
Long-term mortality after lower extremity amputation (LEA) is not well reported in low- and middle-income countries. The primary aim of this study was to report 30-day and one-year mortality after LEA in South Africa. The secondary objective was to report risk factors for one-year mortality.
Methods:
This was a retrospective study of patients undergoing LEA at New Somerset Hospital, a second-level government facility in Cape Town, South Africa from October 1, 2015 to October 31, 2016. A medical record review was undertaken to identify co-morbidities, operation details, and perioperative mortality rate. Outcome status was defined as alive, dead, or lost to follow-up. Outcomes at 30 days and one-year were reported.
Results:
There were 152 patients; 90 (59%) males and the median age was 60 years. Co-morbidities were available for 137 (90%). One hundred and eight (79%) had peripheral vascular disease and 91 (66%) had diabetes mellitus. Fifty-three (35%) had more than one LEA on the same or contralateral limb. There were 183 LEAs in 152 patients. The most common LEA was above knee amputation (n=104, 57%) followed by below-knee amputation (n=36, 20%). At 30 days, 102 (67%) of 152 were traced and 12 (12%) were dead. At one year, 86 (57%) were traced and 37 (43%) were dead.
Conclusions:
At this second-level South African hospital, 43% of patients undergoing LEA were dead after one year. In resource-constrained settings, mortality data are necessary when considering resource allocation for LEA and essential surgical care packages.