State of African neurosurgical education: a protocol for an analysis of publicly available curricula

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State of African neurosurgical education: a protocol for an analysis of publicly available curricula


JournalJournal of Surgical Protocols and Research Methodologies
Article typeJournal research article – Clinical research
Publication date – Oct – 2022
Authors – Setthasorn Zhi Yang Ooi, Olaoluwa Ezekiel Dada, Joseline Haizel-Cobbina, George William Bukenya, Celestin Bilong Mbangtang, Paix de Dieu Ngo Makambo, Adrien Tangmi Djabo, Yves Jordan Kenfack, Wah Praise Senyuy, Olga Djoutsop Mbougo, Nancy Abu-Bonsrah, Claire Karekezi, Thioub Mbaye, Landry Konan, Luxwell Jokonya, Andrew F Alalade, Ulrick Sidney Kanmounye
KeywordsAfrica, low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), neurosurgical disease, neurosurgical training
Open access – Yes
SpecialityNeurosurgery, Surgical education
World region Central Africa, Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa

Language – English
Submitted to the One Surgery Index on October 29, 2022 at 9:46 pm
Abstract:

Background
Africa bears >15% of the global burden of neurosurgical disease. Yet to date, Africa still has the lowest neurosurgical workforce density globally, and efforts to fill this gap by 2030 need to be multiplied. Although the past decade has seen an increase in neurosurgery residency programs in the continent, it is unclear how these residency programs are similar or viable. This study aims to highlight the current status of neurosurgical training in Africa as well as the differences within departments, countries or African regions.

Methods
A literature search using keywords related to ‘neurosurgery’, ‘training’, and ‘Africa’ and relevant names of African countries will be performed on PubMed and Google Scholar. If unavailable online, the authors will contact local neurosurgeons at identified training programmes for their curricula. The residency curricula collected will be analysed against a standardized and validated medical education curriculum viability tool.

Results
The primary aim will be the description of African neurosurgical curricula. In addition, the authors will perform a comparative analysis of the identified African neurosurgical curricula using a standardized and validated medical education curriculum viability tool.

Discussion
This study will be the first to evaluate the current landscape of neurosurgery training in Africa and will highlight pertinent themes that may be used to guide further research. The findings will inform health system strengthening efforts by local training programme directors, governments, policymakers and stakeholders.Background
Africa bears >15% of the global burden of neurosurgical disease. Yet to date, Africa still has the lowest neurosurgical workforce density globally, and efforts to fill this gap by 2030 need to be multiplied. Although the past decade has seen an increase in neurosurgery residency programs in the continent, it is unclear how these residency programs are similar or viable. This study aims to highlight the current status of neurosurgical training in Africa as well as the differences within departments, countries or African regions.

Methods
A literature search using keywords related to ‘neurosurgery’, ‘training’, and ‘Africa’ and relevant names of African countries will be performed on PubMed and Google Scholar. If unavailable online, the authors will contact local neurosurgeons at identified training programmes for their curricula. The residency curricula collected will be analysed against a standardized and validated medical education curriculum viability tool.

Results
The primary aim will be the description of African neurosurgical curricula. In addition, the authors will perform a comparative analysis of the identified African neurosurgical curricula using a standardized and validated medical education curriculum viability tool.

Discussion
This study will be the first to evaluate the current landscape of neurosurgery training in Africa and will highlight pertinent themes that may be used to guide further research. The findings will inform health system strengthening efforts by local training programme directors, governments, policymakers and stakeholders.

OSI Number – 21794

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