Secondary Peritonitis and Intra-Abdominal Sepsis: An Increasingly Global Disease in Search of Better Systemic Therapies

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Secondary Peritonitis and Intra-Abdominal Sepsis: An Increasingly Global Disease in Search of Better Systemic Therapies


JournalScandinavian Journal of Surgery
Article typeJournal research article – Literature review, Clinical research
Publication date – Jan – 2021
Authors – T. W. Clements, C. G. Ball,M. Tolonen, A. W. Kirkpatrick
Keywordshuman microbiome, intra-abdominal sepsis, multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, pathobiome, peritonitis, secondary peritonitis
Open access – Yes
SpecialityGeneral surgery
World region Global

Language – English
Submitted to the One Surgery Index on January 17, 2021 at 7:23 am
Abstract:

Secondary peritonitis and intra-abdominal sepsis are a global health problem. The life-threatening systemic insult that results from intra-abdominal sepsis has been extensively studied and remains somewhat poorly understood. While local surgical therapy for perforation of the abdominal viscera is an age-old therapy, systemic therapies to control the subsequent systemic inflammatory response are scarce. Advancements in critical care have led to improved outcomes in secondary peritonitis. The understanding of the effect of secondary peritonitis on the human microbiome is an evolving field and has yielded potential therapeutic targets. This review of secondary peritonitis discusses the history, classification, pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment, and future directions of the management of secondary peritonitis. Ongoing clinical studies in the treatment of secondary peritonitis and the open abdomen are discussed

OSI Number – 20874

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[whohit]-Secondary Peritonitis and Intra-Abdominal Sepsis: An Increasingly Global Disease in Search of Better Systemic Therapies-[/whohit]