Role of North America and AANS in Global Neurosurgery

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Role of North America and AANS in Global Neurosurgery


JournalJournal of Global Neurosurgery
Article typeJournal research article – Literature review
Publication date – Apr – 2021
Authors – Anil Nanda, Bharath Raju, Fareed Jumah
KeywordsLCoGS, LMICs, neurosurgeons, safe surgery
Open access – Yes
SpecialityHealth policy, Neurosurgery
World region Northern America
Country: United States of America
Language – English
Submitted to the One Surgery Index on April 27, 2021 at 3:31 am
Abstract:

Approximately 28% of the global burden of disease is surgical (1). There is an estimated deficit of 90,909 neurosurgeons globally, who must care for an additional 14 million neurosurgical patients annually (2). In a study published by Alkire et al. on global access to surgical care, it was revealed that approximately two-thirds of the world’s population, comprising 4.8 billion people, do not have access to timely, affordable, or safe surgical care. The study also concluded that 99.3% of Lower-Income Countries (LICs) and 96.7% of Lower Middle-Income Countries (LMICs) populations do not have access to safe surgery (3).

Historically, global health policies focused on specific issues like access to healthcare and outcomes of infectious disease treatment and vaccinations. In January 2014, the Lancet Commission on Global Surgery (LCoGS), headed by healthcare leaders from 111 countries, gathered in Boston to research and propose strategies to improve surgery access globally. One of the committee’s goals was to bring surgeons from different socio-economic strata under one roof to facilitate collaboration and fruitful exchange of ideas. The committee also motivated the higher-income countries of North America to collaborate and shrink the existing hiatus in surgical access present in lower and middle-income countries (4). Since then, significant progress has been achieved in this regard under the leadership of North American academic institutes, neurosurgical societies, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and even individual surgeons

OSI Number – 21054

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