Return to work in survivors of primary brain Tumours treated with intensity modulated radiotherapy

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Return to work in survivors of primary brain Tumours treated with intensity modulated radiotherapy


JournalCancer Treatment and Research Communications
Article typeJournal research article – Clinical research
Publication date – Jan – 2021
Authors – Mohammed A.R.Basalathullah, Monica Malik, Deepthi Valiyaveettil, Nadendla Beulah, Elizabeth Syed, Fayaz Ahmed
KeywordsEmployment, Imrt, Primary brain, Re-employment, Return to work, tumours
Open access – Yes
SpecialityNeurosurgery
World region Southern Asia
Country: India
Language – English
Submitted to the One Surgery Index on January 14, 2021 at 10:36 am
Abstract:

Mini
Primary Brain Tumour survivors usually have significant morbidity, especially cognitive and neurological dysfunction. Return to pre-diagnosis work can be an important QoL indicator and outcomes measure in these patients. We did a retrospective study to assess return to work amongst the patients who underwent radiotherapy at our centre.

Background
Primary brain tumour (PBT) survivors have a high burden of morbidity. Return to work (RTW) is an important survivorship parameter and outcomes measure in these patients, especially in developing countries. This study was done to assess RTW after radiotherapy, reasons for no RTW, and relationship of RTW with treatment and patient factors.

Patients and Methods
A single centre study was done amongst PBT patients. Baseline and treatment details, education, employment was assessed. RTW assessed as: time to RTW, full/ part-time, reasons for no RTW and RTW at 6 months post-therapy, and last follow up.

Results
67 PBT patients with a median age of 42 years were assessed. Most common diagnosis was low grade glioma. Over 66% patients were illiterate, and 62% had semi-skilled and unskilled jobs, mostly agriculture. About 64.4% patients returned to employment in a median time of 3 months. At 6 months post-treatment 58.2% had a job, with only 42% working full-time. ‘Limb weakness’ (21.4%), followed by ‘loss of job/ no job’ (16.7%), ‘fatigue’/ ‘tiredness’ (14.3%), ‘poor vision/ diminished vision’ (11.9%) were the common reasons for no RTW. The factors found to be significantly associated with return to work were younger age (p = 0.042), male sex (0.013), the absence of complications during radiotherapy (p = 0.049), part time job prior to diagnosis (p = 0.047), and early return to work after RT (p < 0.001).

Conclusion
Studies are needed to identify the barriers in re- employment and steps to overcome them in cancer patients

OSI Number – 20861

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