Recording patient data in burn unit logbooks in Rwanda – who and what are we missing?

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Recording patient data in burn unit logbooks in Rwanda – who and what are we missing?


JournalJournal of Burn Care & Research
Publication date – Oct – 2020
Authors – Elizabeth Miranda, MD MPH, Lotta Velin, Faustin Ntirenganya, MD PhD, Robert Riviello, MD MPH, Francoise Mukagaju, MD, Ian Shyaka, MD, Yves Nezerwa, MD, Laura Pompermaier, MD PhD
KeywordsBurn injury, burn registry, global surgery, missing data, Rwanda
Open access – Yes
SpecialityEmergency surgery, Trauma and orthopaedic surgery
World region Eastern Africa
Country: Rwanda
Language – English
Submitted to the One Surgery Index on November 9, 2020 at 10:13 am
Abstract:

Systematic data collection in high-income countries has demonstrated a decreasing burn morbidity and mortality, whereas lack of data from low- and middle-income countries hinder a global overview of burn epidemiology. In low- and middle-income countries, dedicated burn registries are few. Instead, burn data are often recorded in logbooks or as one variable in trauma registries, where incomplete or inconsistently recorded information is a known challenge. The University Teaching Hospital of Kigali hosts the only dedicated burn unit in Rwanda and has collected data on patients admitted for acute burn care in logbooks since 2005. This study aimed to assess the data registered between January 2005 and December 2019, to evaluate the extent of missing data, and to identify possible factors associated with “missingness”. All data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, Fisher’s exact test, and Wilcoxon Rank Sum test. In this study, 1,093 acute burn patients were included and 64.2% of them had incomplete data. Data completeness improved significantly over time. The most commonly missing variables were whether the patient was referred from another facility and information regarding whether any surgical intervention was performed. Missing data on burn mechanism, burn degree, and surgical treatment were associated with in-hospital mortality. In conclusion, missing data is frequent for acute burn patients in Rwanda, although improvements have been seen over time. As Rwanda and other low- and middle-income countries strive to improve burn care, ensuring data completeness will be essential for the ability to accurately assess the quality of care, and hence improve it.

OSI Number – 20735
PMID – 33128370

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