Public awareness, knowledge of availability, and willingness to use neurosurgical care services in Sub-Saharan Africa: A cross-sectional study

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Public awareness, knowledge of availability, and willingness to use neurosurgical care services in Sub-Saharan Africa: A cross-sectional study


Journalplos one
Article typeJournal research article – Clinical research
Publication date – Mar – 2022
Authors – Chibuikem A. Ikwuegbuenyi, Alice Umutoni, Neri Ngole Atabe Ngwene, Placide Ngoma, Arsene Daniel Nyalundja, Daniel Safari Nteranya, Tunde A. Olobatoke, Oloruntoba Ogunfolaji, Dawin Sichimba, Joanitor Najjuma, Lorraine Arabang Sebopelo, Aliyu Ndajiwo, Michael A. Bamimore, Gideon Adegboyega, Ulrick Sidney Kanmounye
Keywordshealthcare-seeking, Low-and middle-income countries, neurosurgical disease, Public awareness
Open access – Yes
SpecialityNeurosurgery
World region Central Africa, Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa

Language – English
Submitted to the One Surgery Index on March 31, 2022 at 1:39 am
Abstract:

Introduction
Low- and middle-income countries bear the majority of neurosurgical disease burden and patients face significant barriers to seeking, reaching, and receiving care. We aimed to understand barriers to seeking care among adult Africans by evaluating the public perception, knowledge of availability, and readiness to use neurosurgical care services.

Methods
An e-survey was distributed among African adults who are not in the health sector or pursuing a health-related degree. Chi-square test and ANOVA were used for bivariate analysis and the alpha value was set at 0.05. Odds ratios and their 95% confidence intervals were calculated.

Results
Six hundred and sixty-two adults from 16 African countries aged 25.4 (95% CI: 25.0, 25.9) responded. The majority lived in urban settings (90.6%) and were English-speaking (76.4%) men (54.8%). Most respondents (76.3%) could define neurosurgery adequately. The most popular neurosurgical diseases were traumatic brain injury (76.3%), congenital brain and spine diseases (67.7%), and stroke (60.4%). Unwillingness to use or recommend in-country neurosurgical services was associated with rural dwelling (β = -0.69, SE = 0.31, P = 0.03), lack of awareness about the availability of neurosurgeons in-country (β = 1.02, SE = 0.20, P<0.001), and believing neurosurgery is expensive (β = -1.49, SE = 0.36, P<0.001).

Conclusion
Knowledge levels about neurosurgery are satisfactory; however, healthcare-seeking is negatively impacted by multiple factors.

OSI Number – 21541

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