Pre-course online cases for the world health organization’s basic emergency care course in Uganda: A mixed methods analysis

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Pre-course online cases for the world health organization’s basic emergency care course in Uganda: A mixed methods analysis


JournalAfrican Journal of Emergency Medicine
Article typeJournal research article – Clinical research
Publication date – Apr – 2022
Authors – Alexandra Friedman, Lee A. Wallis, Julia C. Bullick, Charmaine Cunningham, Joseph Kalanzi, Peter Kavuma, Martha Osiro, Steven Straube, Andrea G. Tenner
KeywordsBlended learning, emergency, Low Resource, Short courses
Open access – Yes
SpecialityEmergency surgery, Surgical education
World region Eastern Africa
Country: Uganda
Language – English
Submitted to the One Surgery Index on May 3, 2022 at 11:47 pm
Abstract:

Introduction
The Ministry of Health – Uganda implemented the World Health Organization’s Basic Emergency Care course (BEC1) to improve formal emergency care training and address its high burden of acute illness and injury. The BEC is an open-access, in-person, short course that provides comprehensive basic emergency training in low-resource settings. A free, open-access series of pre-course online cases available as downloadable offline files were developed to improve knowledge acquisition and retention. We evaluated BEC participants’ knowledge and self-efficacy in emergency care provision with and without these cases and their perceptions of the cases.

Methods
Multiple Choice Questions (MCQs2) and Likert-scale surveys assessed 137 providers’ knowledge and self-efficacy in emergency care provision, respectively, and focus group discussions explored 74 providers’ perceptions of the BEC course with cases in Kampala in this prospective, controlled study. Data was collected pre-BEC, post-BEC and six-months post-BEC. We used liability analysis and Cronbach alpha coefficients to establish intercorrelation between categorised Likert-scale items. We used mixed model analysis of variance to interpret Likert-scale and MCQ data and thematic content analysis to explore focus group discussions.

Results
Participants gained and maintained significant increases in MCQ averages (15%) and Likert-scale scores over time (p 0.05). Nurses experienced more significant initial gains and long-term decays in MCQ and self-efficacy than doctors (p = 0.009, p < 0.05). Providers found the cases most useful pre-BEC to preview course content but did not revisit them post-course. Technological difficulties and internet costs limited case usage.

Conclusion
Basic emergency care courses for low-resource settings can increase frontline providers’ long-term knowledge and self-efficacy in emergency care. Nurses experienced greater initial gains and long-term losses in knowledge than doctors. Online adjuncts may enhance health professional education in low-to-middle income countries.

OSI Number – 21585

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