Postoperative Pulmonary Complications in Complex Pediatric and Adult Spine Deformity: A Retrospective Review of Consecutive Patients Treated at a Single Site in West Africa

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Postoperative Pulmonary Complications in Complex Pediatric and Adult Spine Deformity: A Retrospective Review of Consecutive Patients Treated at a Single Site in West Africa


JournalGlobal Spine Journal
Publication date – Aug – 2020
Authors – Irene Wulff 1, Henry Ofori Duah 1, Henry Osei Tutu 1, Gerhard Ofori-Amankwah 1, Kwadwo Poku Yankey, Mabel Adobea Owiredu, Halima Bidemi Yahaya, Harry Akoto, Audrey Oteng-Yeboah, Oheneba Boachie-Adjei, FOCOS Spine Research Group
Keywordscomplex spine deformity, deformity, Ghana, pulmonary complication
Open access – Yes
SpecialityNeurosurgery, Trauma and orthopaedic surgery
World region Western Africa
Country: Ghana
Language – English
Submitted to the One Surgery Index on August 30, 2020 at 7:52 pm
Abstract:

Study Design:
Retrospective review of consecutive series.

Objectives:
This study sought to assess the incidence, risk factors, and outcomes of pulmonary complication following complex spine deformity surgery in a low-resourced setting in West Africa.

Methods:
Data of 276 complex spine deformity patients aged 3 to 25 years who were treated consecutively was retrospectively reviewed. Patients were categorized into 2 groups during data analysis based on pulmonary complication status: group 1: yes versus group 2: no. Comparative descriptive and inferential analysis were performed to compare the 2 groups.

Results:
The incidence of pulmonary complication was 17/276 (6.1%) in group 1. A total of 259 patients had no events (group 2). There were 8 males and 9 females in group 1 versus 100 males and 159 females in group 2. Body mass index was similar in both groups (17.2 vs 18.4 kg/m2, P = .15). Average values (group 1 vs group 2, respectively) were as follows: preoperative sagittal Cobb angle (90.6° vs 88.7°, P = .87.), coronal Cobb angle (95° vs 88.5°, P = .43), preoperative forced vital capacity (45.3% vs 62.0%, P = .02), preoperative FEV1 (forced expiratory volume in 1 second) (41.9% vs 63.1%, P < .001). Estimated blood loss, operating room time, and surgery levels were similar in both groups. Thoracoplasty and spinal osteotomies were performed at similar rates in both groups, except for Smith-Peterson osteotomy. Multivariate logistic regression showed that every unit increase in preoperative FEV1 (%) decreases the odds of pulmonary complication by 9% (OR = 0.91, 95% CI 0.84-0.98, P = .013).

Conclusion:
The observed 6.1% incidence of pulmonary complications is comparable to reported series. Preoperative FEV1 was an independent predictor of pulmonary complications. The observed case fatality rate following pulmonary complications (17%) highlights the complexity of cases in underserved regions and the need for thorough preoperative evaluation to identify high-risk patients.

OSI Number – 20635
PMID – 32772734

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