Post-Tuberculosis (TB) Treatment: The Role of Surgery and Rehabilitation

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Post-Tuberculosis (TB) Treatment: The Role of Surgery and Rehabilitation

Journalapplied Sciences
Publication date – Apr – 2020
Authors – Dina Visca, Simon Tiberi, Rosella Centis, Lia D’Ambrosio, Emanuele Pontali, Alessandro Wasum Mariani, Elisabetta Zampogna, Martin van den Boom, Antonio Spanevello and Giovanni Battista Migliori
KeywordsTB; post-treatment sequelae; surgery; pulmonary rehabilitation
Open access – Yes
SpecialityCardiothoracic surgery
World region Global

Language – English
Submitted to the One Surgery Index on June 1, 2020 at 11:53 am
Abstract:

Even though the majority of tuberculosis (TB) programmes consider their work completed when a patient is ‘successfully’ cured, patients often continue to suffer with post-treatment or surgical sequelae. This review focuses on describing the available evidence with regard to the diagnosis and management of post-treatment and surgical sequelae (pulmonary rehabilitation). We carried out a non-systematic literature review based on a PubMed search using specific key-words, including various combinations of ‘TB’, ‘MDR-TB’, ‘XDR-TB’, ‘surgery’, ‘functional evaluation’, ‘sequelae’ and ‘pulmonary rehabilitation’. References of the most important papers were retrieved to improve the search accuracy. We identified the main areas of interest to describe the topic as follows: 1) ‘Surgery’, described through observational studies and reviews, systematic reviews and meta-analyses, IPD (individual data meta-analyses), and official guidelines (GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) or not GRADE-based); 2) Post-TB treatment functional evaluation; and 3) Pulmonary rehabilitation interventions. We also highlighted the priority areas for research for the three main areas of interest. The collection of high-quality standardized variables would allow advances in the understanding of the need for, and effectiveness of, pulmonary rehabilitation at both the individual and the programmatic level. The initial evidence supports the importance of the adequate functional evaluation of these patients, which is necessary to identify those who will benefit from pulmonary rehabilitation.

OSI Number – 20475

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