Outcomes of Renal Trauma in Indian Urban Tertiary Healthcare Centres: A Multicentre Cohort Study

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Outcomes of Renal Trauma in Indian Urban Tertiary Healthcare Centres: A Multicentre Cohort Study


JournalWorld Journal of Surgery
Article typeJournal research article – Clinical research
Publication date – Aug – 2021
Authors – Bhakti Sarang, Nakul Raykar, Anita Gadgil, Gunjan Mishra, Martin Gerdin Wärnberg, Amulya Rattan, Monty Khajanchi, Kapil Dev Soni, Monali Mohan, Naveen Sharma, Vineet Kumar, Deepa KV & Nobhojit Roy On behalf of the Towards Improved Trauma Care Outcomes TITCO-India
KeywordsIndia, minimal-invasive techniques, nephrectomy, Renal Trauma
Open access – Yes
SpecialityGeneral surgery, Trauma surgery, Urology surgery
World region Southern Asia
Country: India
Language – English
Submitted to the One Surgery Index on September 1, 2021 at 10:30 pm
Abstract:

Background
Renal trauma is present in 0.5–5% of patients admitted for trauma. Advancements in radiologic imaging and minimal-invasive techniques have led to decreased need for surgical intervention. We used a large trauma cohort to characterise renal trauma patients, their management and outcomes.

Methods
We analysed “Towards Improved Trauma Care Outcomes in India” cohort from four urban tertiary public hospitals in India between 1st September 2013 and 31st December 2015. The data of patients with renal trauma were extracted using International Classification of Diseases 10 codes and analysed for demographic and clinical details.

Results
A total of 16,047 trauma patients were included in this cohort. Abdominal trauma comprised 1119 (7%) cases, of which 144 (13%) had renal trauma. Renal trauma was present in 1% of all the patients admitted for trauma. The mean age was 28 years (SD-14.7). A total of 119 (83%) patients were male. Majority (93%) were due to blunt injuries. Road traffic injuries were the most common mechanism (53%) followed by falls (29%). Most renal injuries (89%) were associated with other organ injuries. Seven of the 144 (5%) patients required nephrectomy. Three patients had grade V trauma; all underwent nephrectomy. The 30-day in-hospital mortality, in patients with renal trauma, was 17% (24/144).

Conclusion
Most renal trauma patients were managed nonoperatively. 89% of patients with renal trauma had concomitant injuries. The renal trauma profile from this large cohort may be generalisable to urban contexts in India and other low- and middle-income countries.

OSI Number – 21237

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