Neurosurgical Education in Egypt and Africa

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Neurosurgical Education in Egypt and Africa


Journaljournal of neurosurgery
Publication date – Mar – 2020
Authors – Nasser M F El-Ghandour
KeywordsAfrica; education; Egypt; neurosurgery; training
Open access – Yes
SpecialityNeurosurgery, Surgical Education
World region Northern Africa
Country: Egypt
Language – English
Submitted to the One Surgery Index on May 29, 2020 at 8:44 am
Abstract:

Objective: Africa still significantly lags in the development of neurosurgery. Egypt, located in North Africa, is well-developed in this specialty, with the largest number of neurosurgeons among all African countries. This article provides insight into neurosurgical training in Egypt, the challenges African neurosurgeons are facing, and the requirements needed to enhance neurosurgical education and build up the required neurosurgical capacity in Africa.

Methods: The information presented in the current work was collected from databases of the Egyptian Society of Neurological Surgeons and the World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies.

Results: There are two types of neurosurgical certification in Egypt. The first type is granted by the universities (MD), and the second is awarded by the Ministry of Health (Fellow of Neurosurgery). The program in both types ranges from 6 to 9 years. The number of qualified neurosurgeons in Egypt constitutes one-third of the total number of African neurosurgeons. There is a significant shortage of neurological surgeons in Africa, and the distribution is entirely unbalanced, with the majority of neurosurgeons concentrated in the North and South regions. The most important challenge facing neurosurgery in Africa is lack of resources, which is considered to be the main obstacle to the development of neurosurgery. Other challenges include the limited number of neurosurgeons, lack of training programs, and lack of collaboration among the different regions.

Conclusions: Proper collaboration among the different regions within the African continent regarding neurosurgical education will enhance African neurosurgical capacity and make neurosurgery an independent specialty. The definite functional polarity among different regions, regarding both the number of qualified neurosurgeons and the neurosurgical capacity, is an important factor that could help in the development of neurosurgery in this continent

OSI Number – 20431
PMID – 32114548

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