Is Quality of Life After Mastectomy Comparable to That After Breast Conservation Surgery? A 5-year Follow Up Study From Mumbai, India

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Is Quality of Life After Mastectomy Comparable to That After Breast Conservation Surgery? A 5-year Follow Up Study From Mumbai, India


Journalquality of life research
Publication date – Mar – 2020
Authors – K V Deepa , A Gadgil , Jenny Löfgren , S Mehare , Prashant Bhandarkar , N Roy
KeywordsBreast conserving surgery, Mastectomy, Post surgery quality of life, Quality of Life
Open access – Yes
SpecialityPlastic surgery, Surgical oncology
World region South-eastern Asia
Country: India
Language – English
Submitted to the One Surgery Index on May 20, 2020 at 8:10 am
Abstract:

Purpose
Breast cancer is the commonest cancer in women worldwide. Surgery is a central part of the treatment. Modified radical mastectomy (MRM) is often replaced by breast conserving therapy (BCT) in high-income countries. MRM is still the standard choice, in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) as radiotherapy, a mandatory component of BCT is not widely available. It is important to understand whether quality of life (QOL) after MRM is comparable to that after BCT. This has not been studied well in LMICs. We present, 5-year follow-up of QOL scores in breast cancer patients from India.

Methods
We interviewed women undergoing breast cancer surgery preoperatively, at 6 months after surgery, and at 1 year and 5 years, postoperatively. QOL scores were evaluated using FACT B questionnaire. Average QOL scores of women undergoing BCT were compared with those undergoing MRM. Total scores, domain scores and trends of scores over time were analyzed.

Results
We interviewed 54 women with a mean age of 53 years (SD 9 ± years). QOL scores in all the women, dipped during the treatment period, in all subscales but improved thereafter and even surpassed the baseline in physical, emotional and breast-specific domains (p < 0.05) at 5 years. At the end of 5 years, there was no statistically significant difference between the MRM and BCT groups in any of the total or domain scores.

Conclusion
QOL scores in Indian women did not differ significantly between MRM and BCT in the long term. Both options are acceptable in the study setting.

OSI Number – 20385
PMID – 31712944

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