Investing in Surgery: A Value Proposition for African Leaders

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Investing in Surgery: A Value Proposition for African Leaders

JournalLancet
Publication date – Jul – 2020
Authors – Desmond T Jumbam , Ché L Reddy , Emmanuel Makasa , Adeline A Boatin , Khama Rogo , Kathryn M Chu , Benetus Nangombe , Olufemi T Oladapo , John G Meara , Salome Maswime
KeywordsAfrica, Economics, global surgery
Open access – Yes
SpecialityHealth policy
World region Central Africa, Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa

Language – English
Submitted to the One Surgery Index on July 13, 2020 at 2:55 am
Abstract:

Globally, poor access to high-quality surgical, obstetric, and anaesthesia care remains a main contributor to global disease burden accounting for about a third of deaths worldwide. The need for strengthening surgical care systems is especially urgent in sub-Saharan Africa, where access is strikingly limited, leading to the highest mortality and morbidity from surgically preventable and treatable conditions in the world. Approximately 93% of the population of sub-Saharan Africa lacks access to safe, affordable, and timely surgical care, compared with less than 10% in high-income countries.2 Despite the immense and growing need for surgical services in sub-Saharan Africa, investments by African public sector leaders to improve surgical systems on the subcontinent have been inadequate. The current COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted health care globally, with an estimation by the CovidSurg Collaborative showing that more than 28 million surgeries will be postponed or cancelled worldwide during the 12 weeks of peak disruption. There is a basic ethical responsibility to provide surgical care as a fundamental human right, in keeping with the principles espoused in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Additionally, improved access to high-quality surgical care is an essential component of universal health coverage and will contribute to good health and wellbeing, leading to improved human capital—all of which are vital for poverty reduction and economic growth on the continent.

OSI Number – 20585
PMID – 32622399

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