Increasing Antimicrobial Resistance in Surgical Wards at Mulago National Referral Hospital, Uganda, from 2014 to 2018—Cause for Concern?

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Increasing Antimicrobial Resistance in Surgical Wards at Mulago National Referral Hospital, Uganda, from 2014 to 2018—Cause for Concern?


JournalTropical Medicine and Infectious Disease
Article typeJournal research article – Clinical research
Publication date – May – 2021
Authors – Gerald Mboowa ,Dickson Aruhomukama ,Ivan Sserwadda ,Freddy Eric Kitutu ,Hayk Davtyan ,Philip Owiti ,Edward Mberu Kamau ,Wendemagegn Enbiale ,Anthony Reid ,Douglas Bulafu ,Jeffrey Kisukye ,Margaret Lubwama ,Henry Kajumbula
KeywordsAntimicrobial Resistance (AMR), Mulago National Referral Hospital (MNRH), Structured Operational Research and Training IniTiative (SORT IT), surgical wards, trends, Uganda
Open access – Yes
SpecialityGeneral surgery, Health policy, Other
World region Eastern Africa
Country: Uganda
Language – English
Submitted to the One Surgery Index on May 28, 2021 at 6:35 am
Abstract:

Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) and Healthcare Associated Infections (HAIs) are major global public health challenges in our time. This study provides a broader and updated overview of AMR trends in surgical wards of Mulago National Referral Hospital (MNRH) between 2014 and 2018. Laboratory data on the antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of bacterial isolates from 428 patient samples were available. The most common samples were as follows: tracheal aspirates (36.5%), pus swabs (28.0%), and blood (20.6%). Klebsiella (21.7%), Acinetobacter (17.5%), and Staphylococcus species (12.4%) were the most common isolates. The resistance patterns for different antimicrobials were: penicillins (40–100%), cephalosporins (30–100%), β-lactamase inhibitor combinations (70–100%), carbapenems (10–100%), polymyxin E (0–7%), aminoglycosides (50–100%), sulphonamides (80–100%), fluoroquinolones (40–70%), macrolides (40–100%), lincosamides (10–45%), phenicols (40–70%), nitrofurans (0–25%), and glycopeptide (0–20%). This study demonstrated a sustained increase in resistance among the most commonly used antibiotics in Uganda over the five-year study period. It implies ongoing hospital-based monitoring and surveillance of AMR patterns are needed to inform antibiotic prescribing, and to contribute to national and global AMR profiles. It also suggests continued emphasis on infection prevention and control practices (IPC), including antibiotic stewardship. Ultimately, laboratory capacity for timely bacteriological culture and sensitivity testing will provide a rational choice of antibiotics for HAI.

OSI Number – 21107

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