Impact of capnography on patient safety in high- and low-income settings: a scoping review

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Impact of capnography on patient safety in high- and low-income settings: a scoping review


JournalBritish Journal of Anaesthesia
Publication date – Apr – 2020
Authors – Elliot Wollner , Maziar M Nourian , William Booth , Sophia Conover , Tyler Law , Maytinee Lilaonitkul , Adrian W Gelb , Michael S Lipnick
Keywordsairway safety; anaesthesia outcomes; capnography; global health; low-middle income countries (LMICs); patient safety; perioperative morbidity and mortality; scoping review
Open access – Yes
SpecialityAnaesthesia
World region Global

Language – English
Submitted to the One Surgery Index on August 2, 2020 at 11:02 pm
Abstract:

Background: Capnography is universally accepted as an essential patient safety monitor in high-income countries (HICs) yet is often unavailable in low and middle-income countries (LMICs). Increasing capnography availability has been proposed as one of many potential approaches to improving perioperative outcomes in LMICs. This scoping review summarises the existing literature on the effect of capnography on patient outcomes to help prioritise interventions and guide expansion of capnography in LMICs.

Methods: We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE databases for articles published between 1980 and March 2019. Studies that assessed the impact of capnography on morbidity, mortality, or the use of airway interventions both inside and outside the operating room were included.

Results: The search resulted in 7445 unique papers, and 31 were included for analysis. Retrospective and non-randomised data suggest capnography use may improve outcomes in the operating room, ICU, and emergency department, and during resuscitation. Prospective data on capnography use for procedural sedation suggest earlier detection of hypoventilation and a reduction in haemoglobin desaturation events. No randomised studies exist that assess the impact of capnography on patient outcomes.

Conclusion: Despite widespread endorsement of capnography as a mandatory perioperative monitor, rigorous data demonstrating its impact on patient outcomes are limited, especially in LMICs. The association between capnography use and a reduction in serious airway complications suggests that closing the capnography gap in LMICs may represent a significant opportunity to improve patient safety. Additional data are needed to quantify the global capnography gap and better understand the barriers to capnography scale-up in LMICs.

OSI Number – 20607
PMID – 32416994

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