Going Global: Interest in Global Health Among US Otolaryngology Residents

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Going Global: Interest in Global Health Among US Otolaryngology Residents


Journalannals of global health
Article typeJournal research article – Clinical research
Publication date – Aug – 2021
Authors – Julia Toman , Melynda Barnes Oussayef, J. Zachary Porterfield
KeywordsGlobal Health, Otolaryngology, USA
Open access – Yes
SpecialityENT surgery
World region Northern America
Country: United States of America
Language – English
Submitted to the One Surgery Index on August 24, 2021 at 2:01 am
Abstract:

Background: To meet the rising interest in surgical global health, some surgical residency programs offer global health experiences. The level of interest in these programs, however, and their role in residency recruitment and career planning has not been systematically evaluated.

Objective: (1) Define interest in global health among Otolaryngology residents in the USA. (2) Assess engagement of Otolaryngology residencies in global health training. (3) Determine barriers to global health training in residency.

Methods: A survey questionnaire was developed and sent to all Otolaryngology Residency Program Directors for distribution to all current Otolaryngology residents in the US.

Results: A total of 91 complete surveys were collected. A majority of respondents felt that global health was either “very important” or “extremely important” (67%). Two-thirds of respondents had prior global health experience (68%). While 56% of respondents would definitely participate in a global health elective and 78% would likely or definitely participate, only 37% of residency programs offered a global health experience. The availability of a global health elective significantly correlated with residency match choice in respondents with previous global health experience. The three most common barriers to participation were insufficient time, insufficient funding, and lack of program.

Conclusion: Participation in bilateral and equitable international electives is a unique experience of personal and professional growth. There is an interest in these opportunities during residency training among Otolaryngology residents that is not reflected in availability within training programs. This suggests the need for development of humanitarian outreach exposure through global health experiences during surgical residency training.

OSI Number – 21220

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