Exploring the knowledge and attitudes of Cameroonian medical students towards global surgery: A web-based survey

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Exploring the knowledge and attitudes of Cameroonian medical students towards global surgery: A web-based survey


JournalPLOS One
Publication date – Apr – 2020
Authors – Ulrick S. Kanmounye ,Aimé N. Mbonda ,Dylan Djiofack ,Leonid Daya ,Ornella F. Pokam ,Nathalie C. Ghomsi
Keywordsglobal surgery, medical students
Open access – Yes
SpecialitySurgical Education
World region Central Africa
Country: Cameroon
Language – English
Submitted to the One Surgery Index on May 31, 2020 at 1:05 pm
Abstract:

Introduction: Global surgery is a growing field studying the determinants of safe and affordable surgical care and advocating to gain the global health community’s attention. In Cameroon, little is known about the level of knowledge and attitudes of students. Our survey aimed to describe the knowledge and attitudes of Cameroonian medical students towards global surgery.

Materials and methods: We performed an anonymous online survey of final-year Cameroonian medical students. Mann-Whitney U test and Spearman correlation analysis were used for bivariate analysis, and the alpha value was set at 0.05. Odds ratios and their 95% confidence intervals were calculated.

Results: 204 respondents with a mean age of 24.7 years (±2.0) participated in this study. 58.3% were male, 41.6% had previously heard or read about global surgery, 36.3% had taken part in a global surgery study, and 10.8% had attended a global surgery event. Mercy Ships was well known (46.5%), and most students believed that surgical interventions were more costly than medical treatments (75.0%). The mean score of the global surgery evaluation was 47.4% (±29.6%), and being able to recognize more global surgery organizations was correlated with having assumed multiple roles during global surgery studies (p = 0.008) and identifying more global surgery indicators (p = 0.04). Workforce, infrastructure, and funding were highlighted as the top priorities for the development of global surgery in Cameroon.

Conclusion: Medical students are conscious of the importance of surgical care. They lack the opportunities to nurture their interest and should be taught global surgery concepts and skills.

OSI Number – 20453
PMID – 32353038

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