Estimating the Specialist Surgical Workforce Density in South Africa

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Estimating the Specialist Surgical Workforce Density in South Africa


Journalannals of global health
Article typeJournal research article – Clinical research
Publication date – Aug – 2021
Authors – Ritika Tiwari , Usuf Chikte, Kathryn M. Chu
Keywordshealthcare, South Africa, upper middle-income country
Open access – Yes
SpecialityAnaesthesia, General surgery, Health policy, Obstetrics and Gynaecology
World region Southern Africa
Country: South Africa
Language – English
Submitted to the One Surgery Index on August 29, 2021 at 4:46 am
Abstract:

Background: South Africa is an upper middle-income country with inequitable access to healthcare. There is a maldistribution of doctors between the private and public sectors, the latter which serves 86% of the population but has less than half of the human resources.

Objective: The objective of this study was to estimate the specialist surgical workforce density in South Africa.

Methods: This was a retrospective record-based review of the specialist surgical workforce in South Africa as defined by registration with the Health Professionals Council of South Africa for three cadres: 1) surgeons, and 2) anaesthesiologists, and 3) obstetrician/gynaecologists (OBGYN).

Findings: The specialist surgical workforce in South Africa doubled from 2004 (N = 2956) to 2019 (N = 6144). As of December 2019, there were 3096 surgeons (50.4%), 1268 (20.6%) OBGYN, and 1780 (29.0%) anaesthesiologists. The specialist surgical workforce density in 2019 was 10.5 per 100,000 population which ranged from 1.8 in Limpopo and 22.8 per 100,000 in Western Cape province. The proportion of females and those classified other than white increased between 2004–2019.

Conclusion: South Africa falls short of the minimum specialist workforce density of 20 per 100,000 to provide adequate essential and emergency surgical care. In order to address the current and future burden of disease treatable by surgical care, South Africa needs a robust surgical healthcare system with adequate human resources, to translate healthcare services into improved health outcomes.

OSI Number – 21229

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