Estimating the emergency care workforce in South Africa

LATEST ARTICLES
SEARCH INDEX
SUGGEST ARTICLE
THE OSI COLLECTIONS
AUDIOGRAM SERIES
ABOUT THE OSI
2020 SUMMARY
2021 SUMMARY

OSI STATISTICS

Open access articles:
1592
Annotations added:
3
Countries represented:
117
No. of contributors:
15
Bookmarks made:
26

Estimating the emergency care workforce in South Africa



Download audiogram here

JournalAfrican Journal Of Primary Healthcare And Family Medicine
Article typeJournal research article – Clinical research
Publication date – Dec – 2021
Authors – Ritika Tiwari, Raveen Naidoo, René English, Usuf Chikte
Keywordsemergency care personnel, health policy, health service strengthening, health systems, health worker., health workforce forecasting, paramedics, South Africa
Open access – Yes
SpecialityHealth policy
World region Southern Africa
Country: South Africa
Language – English
Submitted to the One Surgery Index on December 15, 2021 at 3:49 am
Abstract:

Background: Emergency care is viewed as a fundamental human right in South Africa’s constitution. In the public sector, all emergency medical services (EMS) come under the Directorate: Emergency Medical Services and Disaster Medicine at the National Department of Health (NDoH), which provides regulation, policy and oversight guidance to provincial structures.

Aim: The aim of the study is to understand the supply and status of human resources for EMS in South Africa.

Setting: This research was undertaken for South Africa using the Health Professions Council of South Africa (HPCSA) database from 2002 to 2019.

Methods: A retrospective record-based review of the HPCSA database was undertaken to estimate the current registered and future need for emergency care personnel forecasted up to 2030.

Results: There are 76% Basic Ambulance Assistants registered with HPCSA. An additional 96 000 personnel will be required in 2030 to maintain the current ratio of 95.9 registered emergency care personnel per 100 000 population. The profile of an emergency care personnel employed in South Africa is likely to be a black male in the age group of 30–39-years, residing in one of the economically better-resourced provinces.

Conclusion: It is time that the current educational framework is revised. Policy interventions must be undertaken to avoid future shortages of the trained emergency care personnel within South Africa.

OSI Number – 21396

Public annotations on this article:
No public annotations yet