Epidemiology of injured patients in rural Uganda: A prospective trauma registry’s first 1000 days

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Epidemiology of injured patients in rural Uganda: A prospective trauma registry’s first 1000 days


Journalplos one
Article typeJournal research article – Clinical research
Publication date – Jan – 2021
Authors – Dennis J. Zheng,Patrick J. Sur,Mary Goretty Ariokot,Catherine Juillard,Mary Margaret Ajiko,Rochelle A. Dicker
KeywordsEpidemiology, LMIC, morbidity, prospective trauma
Open access – Yes
SpecialityHealth policy, Trauma and orthopaedic surgery, Trauma surgery
World region Eastern Africa
Country: Uganda
Language – English
Submitted to the One Surgery Index on January 30, 2021 at 7:13 am
Abstract:

Trauma is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Data characterizing the burden of injury in rural Uganda is limited. Hospital-based trauma registries are a critical tool in illustrating injury patterns and clinical outcomes. This study aims to characterize the traumatic injuries presenting to Soroti Regional Referral Hospital (SRRH) in order to identify opportunities for quality improvement and policy development. From October 2016 to July 2019, we prospectively captured data on injured patients using a locally designed, context-relevant trauma registry instrument. Information regarding patient demographics, injury characteristics, clinical information, and treatment outcomes were recorded. Descriptive, bivariate, and multivariate statistical analyses were conducted. A total of 4109 injured patients were treated during the study period. Median age was 26 years and 63% were male. Students (33%) and peasant farmers (31%) were the most affected occupations. Falls (36%) and road traffic injuries (RTIs, 35%) were the leading causes of injury. Nearly two-thirds of RTIs were motorcycle-related and only 16% involved a pedestrian. Over half (53%) of all patients had a fracture or a sprain. Suffering a burn or a head injury were significant predictors of mortality. The number of trauma patients enrolled in the study declined by five-fold when comparing the final six months and initial six months of the study. Implementation of a context-appropriate trauma registry in a resource-constrained setting is feasible. In rural Uganda, there is a significant need for injury prevention efforts to protect vulnerable populations such as children and women from trauma on roads and in the home. Orthopedic and neurosurgical care are important targets for the strengthening of health systems. The comprehensive data provided by a trauma registry will continue to inform such efforts and provide a way to monitor their progress moving forward.

OSI Number – 20906

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