Effect of Delay of Care for Patients with Craniomaxillofacial Trauma in Rwanda

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Effect of Delay of Care for Patients with Craniomaxillofacial Trauma in Rwanda


JournalOTO Open
Article typeJournal research article – Clinical research
Publication date – Apr – 2022
Authors – Gaelen B. Stanford-Moore, Gilbert Niyigaba, Gratien Tuyishimire, Jenny Yau, Amol Kulkrani, Victor Nyabyenda, Isaie Ncogoza, David A. Shaye
Keywordscraniomaxillofacial trauma, facial reconstruction, facial trauma, Global Health, health equity, mandible fracture
Open access – Yes
SpecialityMaxillofacial and oral surgery, Trauma surgery
World region Central Africa, Eastern Africa
Country: Rwanda
Language – English
Submitted to the One Surgery Index on May 3, 2022 at 11:54 pm
Abstract:

Objectives
Craniomaxillofacial (CMF) trauma represents a significant proportion of global surgical disease burden, disproportionally affecting low- and middle-income countries where care is often delayed. We investigated risk factors for delays to care for patients with CMF trauma presenting to the highest-volume trauma hospital in Rwanda and the impact on complication rates.

Study Design
This prospective cohort study comprised all patients with CMF trauma presenting to the University Teaching Hospital of Kigali, Rwanda, between June 1 and October 1, 2020.

Setting
Urban referral center in resource-limited setting.

Methods
Epidemiologic data were collected, and logistic regression analysis was undertaken to explore risk factors for delays in care and complications.

Results
Fifty-four patients (94.4% men) met criteria for inclusion. The mean age was 30 years. A majority of patients presented from a rural setting (n = 34, 63%); the most common cause of trauma was motor vehicle accident (n = 18, 33%); and the most common injury was mandibular fracture (n = 28, 35%). An overall 78% of patients had delayed treatment of the fracture after arrival to the hospital, and 81% of these patients experienced a complication (n = 34, P = .03). Delay in treatment was associated with 4-times greater likelihood of complication (odds ratio, 4.25 [95% CI, 1.08-16.70]; P = .038).

Conclusion
Delay in treatment of CMF traumatic injuries correlates with higher rates of complications. Delays most commonly resulted from a lack of surgeon and/or operating room availability or were related to transfers from rural districts. Expansion of the CMF trauma surgical workforce, increased operative capacity, and coordinated transfer care efforts may improve trauma care.

OSI Number – 21587

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