Surgical Site Infections Rates in More Than 13,000 Surgical Procedures in Three Cities in Peru: Findings of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium

LATEST ARTICLES
SEARCH INDEX
SUGGEST ARTICLE
THE OSI COLLECTIONS
AUDIOGRAM SERIES
ABOUT THE OSI
2020 SUMMARY

OSI STATISTICS

Open access articles:
840
Annotations added:
3
Countries represented:
106
No. of contributors:
12
Bookmarks made:
21

Surgical Site Infections Rates in More Than 13,000 Surgical Procedures in Three Cities in Peru: Findings of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium


JournalSurgical Infections
Publication date – Oct – 2015
Authors – Ramírez-Wong Fernando M. , Atencio-Espinoza Teodora , Rosenthal Victor D. , Ramirez Eliza , Torres-Zegarra Socorro L. , Díaz Tavera Zoila Rosa , Sarmiento López Favio , Silva Astete Nazario , Campos Guevara Francisco , Bazan Mendoza Carlos , Valencia Ramírez Augusto , and Soto Pastrana Javier
Keywordsinfection, nosocomial, prospective, ssi
Open access – No
SpecialityOther
World region South America
Country: Afghanistan, Peru
Language – English
Submitted to the One Surgery Index on June 29, 2018 at 2:50 am
Abstract:

BACKGROUND: Surgical site infections (SSIs) are a threat to patient safety. However, there are not available data on SSI rates stratified by surgical procedure (SP) in Peru.

METHODS: From January 2005 to December 2010, a cohort prospective surveillance study on SSIs was conducted by the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC) in four hospitals in three cities of Peru. Data were recorded from hospitalized patients using the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-National Healthcare Safety Network (CDC-NHSN) methods and definitions for SSI. Surgical procedures (SPs) were classified into 4 types, according to ICD-9 criteria.

RESULTS: We recorded 352 SSIs, associated to 13,904 SPs (2.5%; CI, 2.3-2.8) SSI rates per type of SP were the following for this study’s Peruvian hospitals, compared with rates of the INICC and CDC-NHSN reports, respectively: 2.9% for appendix surgery (vs. 2.9% vs. 1.4%); 2.8% for gallbladder surgery (vs. 2.5% vs. 0.6%); 2.2% for cesarean section (vs. 0.7% vs. 1.8%); 2.8% for vaginal hysterectomy (vs. 2.0% vs. 0.9%).

CONCLUSIONS: Our SSIs rates were higher in all of the four analyzed types of SPs compared with CDC-NHSN, whereas compared with INICC, most rates were similar. This study represents an important advance in the knowledge of SSI epidemiology in Peru that will allow us to introduce targeted interventions.

OSI Number – 10003
PMID – 26125113

Public annotations on this article:
No public annotations yet