Economic evaluation of expanding inguinal hernia repair among adult males in Ghana

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Economic evaluation of expanding inguinal hernia repair among adult males in Ghana


Journalplos global public health
Article typeJournal research article – Clinical research
Publication date – Apr – 2022
Authors – Zin Min Thet Lwin, Birger Forsberg, George Keel, Jessica H. Beard, Joachim Amoako, Michael Ohene-Yeboah, Stephen Tabiri, Jenny Löfgren
Keywordsdisability-adjusted life year (DALY), Economic evaluation, Ghana, inguinal hernia
Open access – Yes
SpecialityGeneral surgery
World region Western Africa
Country: Ghana
Language – English
Submitted to the One Surgery Index on April 16, 2022 at 7:37 am
Abstract:

An unmet need for inguinal hernia repair is significant in Ghana where the number of specialist general surgeons is extremely limited. While surgical task sharing with medical doctors without formal specialist training in surgery has been adopted for inguinal hernia repair in Ghana, no prior research has been conducted on the long-term costs and health outcomes associated with expanding operations to repair all inguinal hernias among adult males in Ghana. The study aimed to estimate cost-effectiveness of elective open mesh repair performed by medical doctors and surgeons for adult males with primary inguinal hernia compared to no treatment in Ghana and to project costs and health gains associated with expanding operation services through task sharing between medical doctors and surgeons. The study analysis adopted a healthcare system perspective. A Markov model was constructed to assess 10-year differences in costs and outcomes between operations conducted by medical doctors or surgeons and no treatment. A 10-year budget impact analysis on service expansion for groin hernia repair through increasing task sharing between the providers was conducted. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios for medical doctors and surgeons were USD 120 and USD 129 respectively per disability-adjusted life year (DALY) averted compared to no treatment, which are below the estimated threshold value for cost-effectiveness in Ghana of USD 371–491. Repairing all inguinal hernias (1.4 million) through task sharing between the providers in the same timeframe is estimated to cost USD 194 million. Total health gains of 1.5 million DALYs averted are expected. Inguinal hernia repair is cost-effective regardless of the type of surgical provider. Scaling up of inguinal hernia repair is worthwhile, with the potential to substantially reduce the disease burden in the country.

OSI Number – 21557

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