Delineating natural catchment health districts with routinely collected health data from women’s travel to give birth in Ghana

LATEST ARTICLES
SEARCH INDEX
SUGGEST ARTICLE
THE OSI COLLECTIONS
AUDIOGRAM SERIES
ABOUT THE OSI
2020 SUMMARY
2021 SUMMARY

OSI STATISTICS

Open access articles:
1578
Annotations added:
3
Countries represented:
117
No. of contributors:
13
Bookmarks made:
26

Delineating natural catchment health districts with routinely collected health data from women’s travel to give birth in Ghana


JournalBMC Health Services Research
Article typeJournal research article – Clinical research
Publication date – Jun – 2022
Authors – Winfred Dotse-Gborgbortsi, Andrew J. Tatem, Zoë Matthews, Victor Alegana, Anthony Ofosu, Jim Wright
KeywordsGeographic information systems, Health catchment areas, Health information systems, Health services accessibility, Health systems plans, Maternal health services
Open access – Yes
SpecialityObstetrics and Gynaecology
World region Western Africa
Country: Ghana
Language – English
Submitted to the One Surgery Index on July 1, 2022 at 10:12 pm
Abstract:

Background
Health service areas are essential for planning, policy and managing public health interventions. In this study, we delineate health service areas from routinely collected health data as a robust geographic basis for presenting access to maternal care indicators.

Methods
A zone design algorithm was adapted to delineate health service areas through a cross-sectional, ecological study design. Health sub-districts were merged into health service areas such that patient flows across boundaries were minimised. Delineated zones and existing administrative boundaries were used to provide estimates of access to maternal health services. We analysed secondary data comprising routinely collected health records from 32,921 women attending 27 hospitals to give birth, spatial demographic data, a service provision assessment on the quality of maternal healthcare and health sub-district boundaries from Eastern Region, Ghana.

Results
Clear patterns of cross border movement to give birth emerged from the analysis, but more women originated closer to the hospitals. After merging the 250 sub-districts in 33 districts, 11 health service areas were created. The minimum percent of internal flows of women giving birth within any health service area was 97.4%. Because the newly delineated boundaries are more “natural” and sensitive to observed flow patterns, when we calculated areal indicator estimates, they showed a marked improvement over the existing administrative boundaries, with the inclusion of a hospital in every health service area.

Conclusion
Health planning can be improved by using routine health data to delineate natural catchment health districts. In addition, data-driven geographic boundaries derived from public health events will improve areal health indicator estimates, planning and interventions.

OSI Number – 21645

Public annotations on this article:
No public annotations yet