Cost-effectiveness of Emergency Care Interventions in Low and Middle-Income Countries: A Systematic Review

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Cost-effectiveness of Emergency Care Interventions in Low and Middle-Income Countries: A Systematic Review


JournalBulletin of World Health Organization
Publication date – May – 2020
Authors – Kalin Werner , Nicholas Risko , Taylor Burkholder , Kenneth Munge , Lee Wallis , Teri Reynolds
Keywordsemergency surgery, LMICs
Open access – Yes
SpecialityEmergency surgery
World region Global

Language – English
Submitted to the One Surgery Index on June 28, 2020 at 1:07 am
Abstract:

Objective: To systematically review and appraise the quality of cost-effectiveness analyses of emergency care interventions in low- and middle-income countries.

Methods: Following the PRISMA guidelines, we systematically searched PubMed®, Scopus, EMBASE®, Cochrane Library and Web of Science for studies published before May 2019. Inclusion criteria were: (i) an original cost-effectiveness analysis of emergency care intervention or intervention package, and (ii) the analysis occurred in a low- and middle-income setting. To identify additional primary studies, we hand searched the reference lists of included studies. We used the Consolidated Health Economic Evaluation Reporting Standards guideline to appraise the quality of included studies.

Results: Of the 1674 articles we identified, 35 articles met the inclusion criteria. We identified an additional four studies from the reference lists. We excluded many studies for being deemed costing assessments without an effectiveness analysis. Most included studies were single-intervention analyses. Emergency care interventions evaluated by included studies covered prehospital services, provider training, treatment interventions, emergency diagnostic tools and facilities and packages of care. The reporting quality of the studies varied.

Conclusion: We found large gaps in the evidence surrounding the cost-effectiveness of emergency care interventions in low- and middle-income settings. Given the breadth of interventions currently in practice, many interventions remain unassessed, suggesting the need for future research to aid resource allocation decisions. In particular, packages of multiple interventions and system-level changes represent a priority area for future research.

OSI Number – 20552
PMID – 32514199

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