Completeness of Medical Records of Trauma Patients Admitted to the Emergency Unit of a University Hospital, Upper Egypt

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Completeness of Medical Records of Trauma Patients Admitted to the Emergency Unit of a University Hospital, Upper Egypt


JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Article typeJournal research article – Clinical research
Publication date – Dec – 2020
Authors – Zeinab Mohammed, Ahmed Arafa, Shaimaa Senosy, El-Morsy Ahmed El-Morsy, Emad El-Bana, Yaseen Saleh, Jon Mark Hirshon
KeywordsEgypt, emergency departments, LMICs, Medical records, trauma, Trauma registries
Open access – Yes
SpecialityEmergency surgery, Trauma and orthopaedic surgery, Trauma surgery
World region Northern Africa
Country: Egypt
Language – English
Submitted to the One Surgery Index on January 5, 2021 at 6:49 am
Abstract:

Trauma records in Egyptian hospitals are widely suspected to be inadequate for developing a practical and useful trauma registry, which is critical for informing both primary and secondary prevention. We reviewed archived paper records of trauma patients admitted to the Beni-Suef University Hospital in Upper Egypt for completeness in four domains: demographic data including contact information, administrative data tracking patients from admission to discharge, clinical data including vital signs and Glasgow Coma Scale scores, and data describing the causal traumatic event (mechanism of injury, activity at the time of injury, and location/setting). The majority of the 539 medical records included in the study had significant deficiencies in the four reviewed domains. Overall, 74.3% of demographic fields, 66.5% of administrative fields, 55.0% of clinical fields, and just 19.9% of fields detailing the causal event were found to be completed. Critically, oxygen saturation, arrival time, and contact information were reported in only 7.6%, 25.8%, and 43.6% of the records, respectively. Less than a fourth of the records provided any details about the cause of trauma. Accordingly, the current, paper-based medical record system at Beni-Suef University Hospital is insufficient for the development of a practical trauma registry. More efforts are needed to develop efficient and comprehensive documentation of trauma data in order to inform and improve patient care.

OSI Number – 20859

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