Children with Conductive Hearing Loss Fitted with Hearing Aids: Outcomes and Caregiver Experiences in South Africa

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Children with Conductive Hearing Loss Fitted with Hearing Aids: Outcomes and Caregiver Experiences in South Africa


JournalInternational Archives of Otorhinolaryngoly
Article typeJournal research article – Clinical research
Publication date – Jul – 2022
Authors – Chéri van Zyl , Talita le Roux , De Wet Swanepoel 
KeywordsCaregivers, conductive hearing loss, hearing aids, outcome measures, pediatrics
Open access – Yes
SpecialityENT surgery
World region Southern Africa
Country: South Africa
Language – English
Submitted to the One Surgery Index on July 28, 2022 at 12:34 am
Abstract:

Introduction Hearing aids are a frequent management option for children with conductive hearing loss (CHL) and it is necessary to determine the efficacy of outcomes. Limited information regarding caregivers’ perceptions and experiences are available to examine outcomes in this population.

Objectives To describe hearing aid outcomes and caregivers’ experiences for children with CHL who wear behind-the-ear (BTE) hearing aids.

Methods Retrospective review of clinical data from 19 children between 0 and 13 years of age with CHL, who were fitted with BTE hearing aids between January 2017 and March 2020. Hearing aid outcomes were documented at one month post-hearing aid fitting, via average daily use and caregiver and teacher reports obtained through the Parents’ Evaluation of Aural/oral performance of Children (PEACH) and the Teachers’ Evaluation of Aural/oral performance of Children (TEACH). Telephonic surveys were conducted with 13 caregivers to explore their experiences. Qualitative data from open-ended questions were analyzed thematically.

Results The average hearing aid use was 6.5 hours/day (2.0 standard deviation, SD; range 4.1–10.3) for bilateral hearing aid users. Questionnaire results indicated that most children (PEACH – 83.3% and TEACH – 92.3%) used their hearing aids more than 75% of the time. Participants performed better in quiet environments with limited sensitivity to loud sounds at home and at school. Reported challenges included stigma and device compliance.

Conclusions Children with CHL used their hearing aids for comparable hours (5–8 hours/day), as reported for children with sensorineural hearing loss, but less than the recommended 10 hours/day required for adequate language development. Caregivers reported benefits equivalent to expectations, with challenges similar to those reported in high-income countries.

OSI Number – 21670

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