Emergency Surgery in Geriatrics: A Retrospective Evaluation in a Single Center

Background
As life expectancy increases in humans, surgical procedures applied to the elderly people are also increasing in parallel with the developments in surgery and postoperative care. A significant number of studies investigating the morbidity-mortality of geriatric patients are related to patients who are undergoing emergency operations. The present study aims to investigate the factors affecting mortality and morbidity after emergency surgery in elderly people.

Methods
The data of 200 patients aged 65 years and over who were operated under emergency conditions in the University of Health Sciences Kartal Dr. Lütfi Kırdar Training and Research Hospital between January and December 2018 were evaluated retrospectively.

Results
Patient’s demographic information, including age, gender, ASA physical status, comorbidities, functional dependency or non-dependency of patients, types of operation, anesthesia technique, duration of operation, intraoperative blood transfusion, the changes of hematocrit levels (during the perioperative period), the outcome after surgery (intensive care admission or ward transfer), were recorded. The risk prediction of short-term mortality has been estimated using CCI and APACHE II scoring systems.

Conclusion
The mean age of the patients was 74.8±6.7 and the number of females (n=134, 67%) outweighed the males. Higher ASA physical status scores, dependent living conditions, long operation time, general anesthesia, intraoperative blood transfusion, low Htc values (<25%), high APACHE II scores and lower scores of 10-years survival by CCI were the factors that affected the acceptance into ICU.

Ultrasound-guided Thrombin Injection for Treatment of Iatrogenic Femoral Artery Pseudoaneurysms Compared With Open Surgery: First Experiences From a Single Institution

Purpose
The frequency of iatrogenic femoral artery pseudoaneurysm (FAP) diagnoses has recently increased due to the growing use of diagnostic and interventional procedures involving large diameter sheaths, as well as more potent anticoagulation procedures. In this study, we aimed to present our experience with ultrasound-guided thrombin injection (UGTI) in patients with iatrogenic FAP.
Methods
We studied patients with FAP who were under anticoagulant or antiplatelet therapies preoperatively, or who had received a loading dose during an interventional procedure. The outcomes of patients with FAP treated with UGTI were compared with those of patients who underwent open surgical repair for pseudoaneurysms.
Results
Among the 55 patients included in this study, 24 had UGTI while 31 had open surgery. The success rate was 95.8% when taking into consideration primary and secondary attempts. The mean duration of the procedure was shorter in patients with UGTI (10.1 ± 3.54 minutes) when compared with those who underwent open surgery (76.55 ± 26.74 minutes, P ≤ 0.001). In addition, the total complication frequency was significantly higher in the open surgery group (P = 0.005), as was their length of hospital stay (P < 0.001). Cost analysis showed significant differences between UGTI ($227.50 ± $82.90) and open surgery ($471.20 ± $437.60, P = 0.01).
Conclusion
We have found that UGTI is the safer and more effective choice of treatment in appropriate patients with FAP, as opposed to surgery

Reversal of Hartmann’s procedure is still a high-morbid surgery?

BACKGROUND: This study evaluated the outcome of the reversal of Hartmann’s procedure based on preoperative and intraoperative risk factors.
METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed 78 cases, whom we applied the Hartmann’s procedure either electively or under emergency conditions in our clinic between the years 2010 and 2016.
RESULTS: Of the cases reviewed in this study, 45 patients were males, and 33 patients were females. Of all cases included in this study, 32 cases were operated due to malignancies, 15 cases were operated due to a perforated diverticulum, and 11 cases were operated due to sigmoid volvulus. Reversal of Hartmann’s was performed in 32 cases. The morbidity and mortality rates for the reversal of Hartmann’s procedure were 37.5% and 0.0%, respectively.
CONCLUSION: The reversal of Hartmann’s procedure appears to be a safe operation with acceptable morbidity rates. If the correct patient selection, correct operation timing and meticulous surgical preparation are performed, the risk of morbidity and mortality of the reversal of Hartmann’s procedure can be minimized.

Uniportal Thoracoscopic Approach For Pulmonary Hydatid Cyst: Preliminary Results.

Pulmonary hydatid cyst is a preventable parasitary disease with high prevalence in low-medium income countries. Thoracoscopic approach is seen in the literature as small-case groups and multiple-port incisions are observed in these studies. Unlike other thoracoscopic approaches for the surgical treatment, we describe the single-port technique for the first time in our study. We attempt to compare the clinical outcomes and preliminary results of patients with pulmonary hydatid cyst treated with either minimally invasive or thoracotomy.The medical records of 66 patients undergoing surgery for pulmonary hydatid cyst disease between January 2013 and July 2017 were reviewed. The number of patients who underwent thoracotomy was 48, whereas 18 were managed by single-port video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery. Variables statistically compared between the 2 groups were age, diameter of the cystic, operation time, volume and duration of the drainage, postoperative complications, length of stay, duration of narcotic analgesic usage, and pain score.Thoracoscopic approach was superior to conventional thoracotomy in terms of operation time, drainage volume, time to drain removal, hospital stay, narcotic analgesic treatment duration, and postoperative pain scores. All thoracoscopic procedures were concluded successfully, and conversion to open surgery was not required. No postoperative mortality was seen in either group. During the follow-up period, no recurrence was encountered in either group.Uniportal thoracoscopic approach is a safe option for the treatment of hydatid cyst disease. It can be used as an alternative to thoracotomy, depending on the size and location of the lesion.