Intravenous lidocaine as adjuvant to general anesthesia in renal surgery.

The role of intraoperative intravenous lidocaine infusion has been previously evaluated for pain relief, inflammatory response, and post-operative recovery, particularly in abdominal surgery. The present study is a randomized double-blinded trial in which we evaluated whether IV lidocaine infusion reduces isoflurane requirement, intraoperative remifentanil consumption and time to post-operative recovery in non-laparoscopic renal surgery. Sixty patients scheduled to undergo elective non-laparoscopic renal surgery under general anesthesia were enrolled to receive either systemic lidocaine infusion (group L: bolus 1.5 mg/kg followed by a continuous infusion at the rate of 2 mg/kg/hr until skin closure) or normal saline (0.9% NaCl solution) (Group C). The depth of anesthesia was monitored using the Bispectral Index Scale (BIS), which is based on measurement of the patient’s cerebral electrical activity. Primary outcome of the study was End-tidal of isoflurane concentration (Et-Iso) at BIS values of 40-60. Secondary outcomes include remifentanil consumption during the operation and time to extubation. Et-Iso was significantly lower in group L than in group C (0.63% ± 0.10% vs 0.92% ± 0.11%, p < 10-3). Mean remifentanil consumption of was significantly lower in group L than in group C (0.13 ± 0.04 µg/kg/min vs 0.18 ± 0.04 µg/kg/min, p < 10-3). Thus, IV lidocaine infusion permits a reduction of 31% in isoflurane concentration requirement and 27% in the intraoperative remifentanil need. In addition, recovery from anesthesia and extubation time was shorter in group L (5.8 ± 1.8 min vs 7.9 ± 2.0 min, p < 10-3). By reducing significantly isoflurane and remifentanil requirements during renal surgery, intravenous lidocaine could provide effective strategy to limit volatile agent and intraoperative opioids consumption especially in low and middle income countries.

Long-term repercussions of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass in a low-income population: assessment ten years after surgery.

to evaluate the weight, nutritional and quality of life of low-income patients after ten years of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB).we conducted a longitudinal, retrospective and descriptive study evaluating the excess weight loss, weight regain, arterial hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, anemia and hypoalbuminemia in 42 patients of social classes D and E submitted to RYGB. We assessed quality of life through the Bariatric Analysis and Reporting Outcome System (BAROS).of the 42 patients, 68.3% defined themselves as doing non-regular physical activity, and only 44.4% and 11.9% had regular medical and nutritional follow-up, respectively. We found a mean excess weight loss of 75.6%±12 (CI=71.9-79.4), and in only one patient there was insufficient weight loss. The mean weight loss was 22.3%±16.2 (CI=17.2-27.3) with 64.04% of the sample presenting regain greater than 15% of the minimum weight; 52.3% of the sample presented anemia after ten years of surgery and 47.6%, iron deficiency. We found hypoalbuminemia in 16.6% of the sample. There was remission of hypertension in 66%, and of type 2 diabetes mellitus, in 50%. BAROS showed an improvement in the quality of life of 85.8% of the patients.in a population with different socioeconomic limitations, RYGB maintained satisfactory results regarding weight loss, but inefficient follow-up may compromise the final result, especially with regard to nutritional deficiencies.avaliar a evolução ponderal, nutricional e a qualidade de vida de pacientes de baixa renda, após dez anos de derivação gástrica em Y de Roux (DGYR).estudo longitudinal, retrospectivo e descritivo, que avaliou a perda do excesso de peso, o reganho de peso, a evolução da hipertensão arterial, do diabetes mellitus tipo 2, da anemia e da hipoalbuminemia em 42 pacientes de classes sociais D e E submetidos à DGYR. A qualidade de vida foi avaliada através do Bariatric Analysis and Reporting Outcome System (BAROS).dos 42 pacientes, 68,3% se definiram como não praticantes de atividade física regular, e somente 44,4% e 11,9% tinham acompanhamento médico e nutricional regulares, respectivamente. Foi encontrada média da perda do excesso de peso de 75,6%±12 (IC=71,9-79,4) e perda ponderal insuficiente apenas em um paciente. O reganho ponderal médio foi de 22,3%±16,2 (IC=17,2-27,3), com 64,04% da amostra apresentando reganho maior do que 15% do peso mínimo. 52,3% da amostra apresentou anemia após dez anos de cirurgia e 47,6% deficiência de ferro. Hipoalbuminemia foi encontrada em 16,6% da amostra. Houve remissão da HAS em 66% e do diabetes mellitus tipo 2 em 50%. O BAROS demonstrou melhora na qualidade de vida em 85,8% dos pacientes.pudemos observar, em uma população com diversas limitações socioeconômicas, que a DGYR manteve resultados satisfatórios quanto à perda peso, mas o seguimento ineficiente pode comprometer o resultado final, especialmente no que diz respeito às deficiências nutricionais.

Surgical outreach and microvascular surgery in developing countries.

Due to the discrepancy between surgical demand and resources in Low-Middle Income Countries (LMIC), surgical outreach programs (SOP) have increased in popularity. In these resource-constrained healthcare environments, the resources necessary to perform basic head and neck procedures are often lacking, and offering microvascular reconstruction adds yet another level of complexity. Here we discuss the difficulties and challenges in establishing a SOP abroad and more specifically some of the challenges specific to microvascular reconstruction – including patient selection, burden of cost, lack of infrastructure and equipment, and patient follow up and outcomes. Although challenges certainly exist, we present the feasibility and the benefit for patient care as well as the role it can play in the foundation development of a low-resource region. The goals of the SOP must be well-defined, and incorporating microvascular surgery can be used as an adjunct to enhance the development of many aspects of the LMIC healthcare system. We present a model of care in which the initial focus is centered on providing safe care to these patients undergoing complex procedures, but after the development of a strong foundation, the focus can begin to include program sustainability and education.

Health Care in Guatemala.

There are 10 hospitals with general surgery training programs in Guatemala. Of those 10 hospitals, only 3 are tertiary care hospitals, and all of these are located in Guatemala City. Two are part of the public health system and the other belongs to a semiprivate public health system. There are currently no colorectal training programs. If a Guatemalan surgeon wishes to pursue a career in coloproctology, he or she has to look for training opportunities abroad.

Creation, Implementation, and Assessment of a General Thoracic Surgery Simulation Course in Rwanda.

Background
The primary objective was to provide proof of concept of conducting thoracic surgical simulation in a low-middle income country. Secondary objectives were to accelerate general thoracic surgery skills acquisition by general surgery residents and sustain simulation surgery teaching through a website, simulation models, and teaching of local faculty.

Methods
Five training models were created for use in a low-middle income country setting and implemented during on-site courses with Rwandan general surgery residents. A website was created as a supplement to the on-site teaching. All participants completed a course knowledge assessment before and after the simulation and feedback/confidence surveys. Descriptive and univariate analyses were performed on participants’ responses.

Results
Twenty-three participants completed the simulation course. Eight (35%) had previous training with the course models. All training levels were represented. Participants reported higher rates of meaningful confidence, defined as moderate to complete on a Likert scale, for all simulated thoracic procedures (p < 0.05). The overall mean knowledge assessment score improved from 42.5% presimulation to 78.6% postsimulation, (p < 0.0001). When stratified by procedure, the mean scores for each simulated procedure showed statistically significant improvement, except for ruptured diaphragm repair (p = 0.45).

Conclusions
General thoracic surgery simulation provides a practical, inexpensive, and expedited learning experience in settings lacking experienced faculty and fellowship training opportunities. Resident feedback showed enhanced confidence and knowledge of thoracic procedures suggesting simulation surgery could be an effective tool in expanding the resident knowledge base and preparedness for performing clinically needed thoracic procedures. Repeated skills exposure remains a challenge for achieving sustainable progress.

Cost-effectiveness of colorectal cancer screening in Ukraine.

Background
Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide and is associated with high mortality when detected at a later stage. There is a paucity of studies from low and middle income countries to support the cost-effectiveness of colorectal cancer screening. We aim to analyze the cost-effectiveness of colorectal cancer screening compared to no screening in Ukraine, a lower-middle income country.

Methods
We developed a deterministic Markov cohort model to assess the cost-effectiveness of three colorectal cancer screening strategies [fecal occult blood test (FOBT) every year, flexible sigmoidoscopy with FOBT every 5 years, and colonoscopy every 10 years] compared to no screening. We modeled outcomes in terms of cost per quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) over a lifetime time horizon. We performed sensitivity analyses on treatment adherence, test characteristics and costs. Analyses were conducted from the perspective of the Ministry of Health of Ukraine.

Results
The base-case lifetime cost-effectiveness analysis showed that all three screening strategies were cost saving compared to no screening, and among the three strategies, colonoscopy every 10 years was the dominant strategy compared to no screening with standard adherence to treatment. When decreased adherence to treatment was modeled, colonoscopy every 10 years was the most cost-effective strategy with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $843 per QALY compared with no screening.

Conclusion
Our findings indicate that colorectal cancer screening can save money and improve health compared to no screening in Ukraine. Colonoscopy every 10 years is superior to the other screening modalities evaluated in this study. This knowledge can be used to concentrate efforts on developing a national screening program in Ukraine.

Risk of Catastrophic Health Expenditure in Rwandan Surgical Patients with Peritonitis.

Background
Surgical procedures are cost-effective compared with various medical and public health interventions. While peritonitis often requires surgery, little is known regarding the associated costs, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. The aim of this study was to determine in-hospital charges for patients with peritonitis and if patients are at risk of catastrophic health expenditure.

Methods
As part of a larger study examining the epidemiology and outcomes of patients with peritonitis at a referral hospital in Rwanda, patients undergoing operation for peritonitis were enrolled and hospital charges were examined. The primary outcome was the percentage of patients at risk for catastrophic health expenditure. Logistic regression was used to determine the association of various factors with risk for catastrophic health expenditure.

Results
Over a 6-month period, 280 patients underwent operation for peritonitis. In-hospital charges were available for 245 patients. A total of 240 (98%) patients had health insurance. Median total hospital charges were 308.1 USD, and the median amount paid by patients was 26.9 USD. Thirty-three (14%) patients were at risk of catastrophic health expenditure based on direct medical expenses. Estimating out-of-pocket non-medical expenses, 68 (28%) patients were at risk of catastrophic health expenditure. Unplanned reoperation was associated with increased risk of catastrophic health expenditure (p < 0.001), whereas patients with community-based health insurance had decreased risk of catastrophic health expenditure (p < 0.001).

Conclusions
The median hospital charges paid out-of-pocket by patients with health insurance were small in relation to total charges. A significant number of patients with peritonitis are at risk of catastrophic health expenditure.

Pattern of Lower Intestinal Ostomies in a Low-Income Country: Case of Southeast of Niger Republic.

Background
Intestinal ostomies are common surgical procedures performed in visceral surgery as part of management for several gastrointestinal diseases. This study aims to report the socio-demographic characteristics, indications and prognosis of intestinal ostomies in low-income country.

Methods
This was a 4-year retrospective study (January 2013 to December 2016) at Zinder National Hospital (Niger). All patients with a digestive ostomy on an ileum or colic segment were included in the study.

Results
During the study period, 2437 patients underwent digestive surgery, including 328 gastrointestinal stomas (13.5%). Patients classified ASA3 were 60.7% (n = 199). The median age was 12 years (IQ: 7–25). Children represent 64% (n = 210) of patients with ostomy. The sex ratio was 2.60. The stoma was performed in emergency in 96.3% (n = 316) of cases. Acute peritonitis was the main indication of the stoma in 70.73% (n = 232). The ileostomies accounted for 75.61% (n = 248). Ostomy was intended as temporary in 97.3% of cases (n = 319). Complications were observed in 188 patients (57.3%). Mortality was 14.02% (n = 46). The indigent status (OR: 4.15 [2.20–7.83], P = 000), ASA score 4 (OR: 2.53 [1.54–4.15], P = 0.0003), Altemeier class IV (OR: 4.03 [2.10–7.73], P = 0.0000) and ileostomy (OR: 2.7853 [1.47–5.29], P = 0.0018) were statistically associated with the occurrence of major complications. The mean time for stoma closure was 59.3 ± 14.5 days.

Conclusion
Acute peritonitis was the main indication of digestive ostomy. The occurrence of major complications was associated with bad socioeconomic status, ASA4 score, Altemeier class IV and ileostomy.

Appendicitis: Rural Patient Status is Associated with Increased Duration of Prehospital Symptoms and Worse Outcomes in High- and Low-Middle-Income Countries.

Introduction
Appendicitis is a significant economic and healthcare burden in low-, middle-, and high-income countries. We aimed to determine whether urban and rural patient status would affect outcomes in appendicitis in a combined population regardless of country of economic status. We hypothesize that patients from rural areas and both high- and low-middle-income countries would have disproportionate outcomes and duration of symptoms compared to their urban counterparts.

Methods
Adults (≥18 years) with appendicitis during 2010–2016 in South Africa and USA were reviewed using multi-institutional data. Baseline demographic, operative details, durations of stay, and complications (Clavien–Dindo index) were collected. AAST grades were assigned by two independent reviewers based on operative findings. Summary, univariate, and multivariable analyses of rural and urban patients in both countries were performed.

Results
There were 2602 patients with a median interquartile range [IQR] of 26 [18–40] years; 45% were female. Initial management included McBurney incisions (n = 458, 18%), laparotomy (n = 915, 35%), laparoscopic appendectomy (n = 1185, 45%), and laparoscopy converted to laparotomy (n = 44, 2%). Comparing rural versus urban patient status, there were increased overall median [IQR] AAST grades (3 [1–5] vs. 2 [1–3], p = 0.001), prehospital duration of symptoms (2 [1–5] vs. 2 [1–3], p = 0.001), complications (44.3 vs. 23%, p = 0.001), and need for temporary abdominal closure (20.3 vs. 6.9%, p = 0.001).

Conclusion
Despite socioeconomic status and country of origin, patients from more rural environments demonstrate poorer outcomes notwithstanding significant differences in overall disease severity. The AAST grading system may serve a potential benchmark to recognize areas with disparate disease burdens. This information could be used for strategic improvements for surgeon placement and availability.

Surgical Site Infection Rates in Seven Cities in Vietnam: Findings of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium

Background: Surgical site infections (SSIs) are the most common healthcare-associated infections (HAI) in lower-income countries. This is the first study to report the results of surveillance on SSI stratified by surgical procedure in seven Vietnamese cities.

Methods: This was a prospective, active SSI surveillance study conducted from November 2008–December 2010 in seven hospitals using the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Healthcare Safety Network (CDC-NHSN) definitions and methods. Surgical procedures (SPs) were classified into 26 types according to the International Classification of Diseases Edition 9 criteria.

Results: We recorded 241 SSIs, associated with 4,413 SPs (relative risk [RR] 5.5%; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 4.8–6.2). The highest SSI rates were found for limb amputation (25%), colon surgery (33%), and small bowel surgery (21%). Compared with CDC-NHSN SSI report, our SSI rates were higher for the following SPs: Limb amputation (25% vs. 1.3%; RR 20.0; p = 0.001); appendix surgery (8.8% vs. 3.5%; RR 2.54; 95% CI 1.3–5.1; p = 0.001); gallbladder surgery (13.7% vs. 1.7%; RR 7.76; 95% CI 1.9–32.1; p = 0.001); colon surgery (18.2% vs. 4.0%; RR 4.56; 95% CI 2.0–10.2; p = 0.001); open reduction of fracture (15.8% vs. 3.4%; RR 4.70, 95% CI 1.5–15.2; p = 0.004); gastric surgery (7.3% vs. 1.7%; RR 4.26; 95% CI 2.2–8.4, p = 0.001); kidney surgery (8.9% vs. 0.9%; RR 10.2; 95% CI 3.8–27.4; p = 0.001); prostate surgery (5.1% vs. 0.9%; RR 5.71; 95% CI 1.9–17.4; p = 0.001); small bowel surgery (20.8% vs. 6.7%; RR 3.07; 95% CI 1.7–5.6; p = 0.001); thyroid or parathyroid surgery (2.4% vs. 0.3%; RR 9.27; 95% CI 1.0–89.1; p = 0.019); and vaginal hysterectomy (14.3% vs. 1.2%; RR 12.3; 95% CI 1.7–88.4; p = 0.001).

Conclusions: Our SSIs rates were significantly higher for 11 of the 26 types of SPs than for the CDC-NHSN. This study advances our knowledge of SSI epidemiology in Vietnam and will allow us to introduce targeted interventions.