Cancer care delivery innovations, experiences and challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic: The Rwanda experience

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Cancer care delivery innovations, experiences and challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic: The Rwanda experience


JournalJournal Global Health
Article typeJournal research article – Clinical research
Publication date – Apr – 2021
Authors – Grace Umutesi, Cyprien Shyirambere, Jean Bosco Bigirimana, Sandra Urusaro,Francois Regis Uwizeye,Evrard Nahimana, Jean D’Amour Tuyishimire, Pacifique Mugenzi, Joel M Mubiligi, Francois Uwinkindi, Fredrick Kateera
Keywordscancer, COVID-19 case, LMICs, Rwanda
Open access – Yes
SpecialityCritical care, Surgical oncology
World region Central Africa
Country: Rwanda
Language – English
Submitted to the One Surgery Index on April 30, 2021 at 7:36 am
Abstract:

Globally, cancer is the second leading cause of mortality. In 2018, 9.6 million lives were lost to cancer of which over 70% occurred in low and middle-income countries (LMICs) where limited access to cancer care and overwhelming late disease presentations negatively impact cancer related survival and quality of life [1]. Moreover, globally, new cancer cases are expected to increase from 18.1 million in 2018 to 21.4 million by 2030 [2]. In settings of poor health care systems and impoverished communities, the scarcity of and limited access to diagnostic and treatment modalities negatively impacts health outcomes and undermines achievement of the universal health care coverage (UHC) targets.

Over the past 20 years, Rwanda has recorded gains in key health indicators including increased life expectancy (from 48.6 in 2000 to 67.4 in 2015); declines in maternal mortality (from 1071 in 2000 to 210 per 100 000 live births in 2015) [3]. Concurrently, impressive gains were registered in the control of infectious diseases such as HIV, tuberculosis and malaria [3]. However, little gains have been recorded for the management of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) where age-standardized NCD mortality rates slightly decreased from 894.9 to 548.6 deaths per 100 000 people from 2000 to 2016 [4,5]. Anecdotally, plausible hindrances to the prevention and control of NCDs in Rwanda include low community awareness, lack of trained providers, limited access to diagnostic services and treatment capacity for complicated cases

OSI Number – 21071

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