Burn Admissions Across Low- and Middle-income Countries: A Repeated Cross-sectional Survey

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Burn Admissions Across Low- and Middle-income Countries: A Repeated Cross-sectional Survey


JournalJournal of Burn Care & Research
Article typeJournal research article – Clinical research
Publication date – Jul – 2022
Authors – Laura Quinn, Tanveer Ahmed, Henry Falk, Ariel Miranda Altamirano, Adelin Muganza, Kiran Nakarmi, Ahmed Nawar, Michael Peck, Shankar Man Rai, Jo Sartori, Luiz Philipe Molina Vana, Benjamin Wabwire, Naiem Moiemen, Richard Lilford
KeywordsBurn Admissions, burn injuries, low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), patients
Open access – Yes
SpecialityPlastic surgery, Trauma surgery
World region Central America, Eastern Africa, Northern Africa, South America, Southern Africa, Southern Asia, Western Africa
Country: Bangladesh, Brazil, Egypt, Kenya, Mexico, Nepal, Nigeria, South Africa
Language – English
Submitted to the One Surgery Index on July 30, 2022 at 2:52 am
Abstract:

Burn injuries have decreased markedly in high-income countries while the incidence of burns remains high in Low- and Middle-Income Countries (LMICs) where more than 90% of burns are thought to occur. However, the cause of burns in LMIC is poorly documented. The aim was to document the causes of severe burns and the changes over time. A cross-sectional survey was completed for 2014 and 2019 in eight burn centers across Africa, Asia, and Latin America: Cairo, Nairobi, Ibadan, Johannesburg, Dhaka, Kathmandu, Sao Paulo, and Guadalajara. The information summarised included demographics of burn patients, location, cause, and outcomes of burns. In total, 15,344 patients were admitted across all centers, 37% of burns were women and 36% of burns were children. Burns occurred mostly in household settings (43–79%). In Dhaka and Kathmandu, occupational burns were also common (32 and 43%, respectively). Hot liquid and flame burns were most common while electric burns were also common in Dhaka and Sao Paulo. The type of flame burns varies by center and year, in Dhaka, 77% resulted from solid fuel in 2014 while 74% of burns resulted from Liquefied Petroleum Gas in 2019. In Nairobi, a large proportion (32%) of burns were intentional self-harm or assault. The average length of stay in hospitals decreased from 2014 to 2019. The percentage of deaths ranged from 5% to 24%. Our data provide important information on the causes of severe burns which can provide guidance in how to approach the development of burn injury prevention programs in LMIC.

OSI Number – 21680

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