Barriers and facilitators of research in Cameroon (Part II) – an e-survey of medical students

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Barriers and facilitators of research in Cameroon (Part II) – an e-survey of medical students


Journalpanafrican medical journal
Publication date – Aug – 2020
Authors – Ulrick Sidney Kanmounye, Joel Noutakdie Tochie, Mazou Temgoua, Aimé Noula Mbonda, Francky Teddy Endomba, Jan René Nkeck, Cynthia Wafo, Ferdinand Ndom Ntock, Desmond Tanko Jumbam
KeywordsBarriers, Cameroon, facilitators, medical student, Research
Open access – Yes
SpecialityHealth policy, Surgical Education
World region Central Africa, Western Africa
Country: Cameroon
Language – English
Submitted to the One Surgery Index on September 1, 2020 at 3:53 am
Abstract:

Introduction: research fosters critical thinking and prepares students for a career in academic medicine. This study aimed to identify the facilitators and barriers to research among Cameroonian medical students.

Methods: an electronic survey was distributed between May 23, 2020, and June 07, 2020. The survey was made of closed-, opened-, and Likert scale questions. A Preference Score (PS) was used to quantify the medical students’ perception of barriers and facilitators to research. The Kruskal-Wallis H and Fisher’s Exact tests were used to evaluate bivariate relationships

Results: one hundred and eighty-eight (188) students with a mean age of 24.1 ± 2.3 years were enrolled. Most respondents were male (56.9%), francophone (69.1%), and in their final year of medical school (46.8%). Twenty-one students (11.1%) had a peer-reviewed article, and all the published students were in their sixth- or seventh-year of undergraduate medical studies. Barriers to research included lack of funding (PS=203), obsolete patient information management systems (PS=198), and limited understanding of biostatistics (PS=197). Facilitators to research included research focused on the student’s interests (PS=255), the study’s capacity to improve practice (PS=247), and scientific recognition (PS=198).
Conclusion: barriers to research among Cameroonian medical students are mainly institutional. However, facilitators are primarily linked to career goals. To improve research activities among these undergraduates, initiatives must target institutional barriers and incentives that foster career development.

OSI Number – 20662

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