Barriers and facilitators of laparoscopic surgical training in rural north-east India: a qualitative study

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Barriers and facilitators of laparoscopic surgical training in rural north-east India: a qualitative study


JournalInternational Journal of Surgery: Global Health
Article typeJournal research article – Clinical research
Publication date – Nov – 2020
Authors – Ellen Wilkinson, Noel Aruparayil, Jesudian Gnanaraj, Anurag Mishra, Lovenish Bains, William Bolton, Julia Brown, David Jayne
Keywordsglobal surgery, laparoscopy, Low Resource, Rural surgery, Surgical training
Open access – Yes
SpecialityGeneral surgery, Other
World region South-eastern Asia
Country: India
Language – English
Submitted to the One Surgery Index on November 26, 2020 at 8:36 pm
Abstract:

Introduction:
Laparoscopic surgery has advantages for treating many abdominal surgical conditions, but its use in low and middle-income countries (LMICs) is limited by many factors, including a lack of training opportunities. The aim of this study was to explore the training experiences of surgeons in rural north-east India to highlight the barriers and facilitators to laparoscopic surgery.

Methods:
Eleven surgeons with experience in laparoscopy in rural north-east India were recruited using purposive and convenience sampling. Ethical approval was obtained from the Institutional Ethics Committee, Maulana Azad Medical College, New Delhi, India and the Leeds Institute of Health Sciences Research Ethics Sub-Committee, West Yorkshire, England. Consenting participants took part in semi-structured interviews, either between May 20 and 25, 2019 in rural north-east India or via Skype or at the University of Leeds in June 2019. Interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed and thematic content analysis performed.

Results:
Exposure to laparoscopy during postgraduate training was common, but training experiences were inconsistent and informal. Alternative training opportunities are limited by availability and cost. There is high demand for a structured curriculum, incorporating formal assessment and credentialing, to include observation and assistance in live surgery and laparoscopic simulation.

Conclusions:
Laparoscopic training experiences are highly variable, with limited training resources and lack of a curriculum. Poor accessibility is consistent with that recorded in literature. Current recommendations include government support and funding to guide development of a standardized curriculum and widen access to training programs for surgeons in rural settings.

OSI Number – 20781

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