A retrospective analysis of peri-operative medication errors from a low-middle income country

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A retrospective analysis of peri-operative medication errors from a low-middle income country


JournalScientific Reports
Article typeJournal research article – Clinical research
Publication date – Jul – 2022
Authors – Shemila Abbasi, Saima Rashid, Fauzia Anis Khan
Keywordsanesthetic management, Medication error, World Health Organization (WHO)
Open access – Yes
SpecialityAnaesthesia
World region Southern Asia
Country: Pakistan
Language – English
Submitted to the One Surgery Index on August 1, 2022 at 10:59 pm
Abstract:

Identifying medication errors is one method of improving patient safety. Peri operative anesthetic management of patient includes polypharmacy and the steps followed prior to drug administration. Our objective was to identify, extract and analyze the medication errors (MEs) reported in our critical incident reporting system (CIRS) database over the last 15 years (2004–2018) and to review measures taken for improvement based on the reported errors. CIRS reported from 2004 to 2018 were identified, extracted, and analyzed using descriptive statistics and presented as frequencies and percentages. MEs were identified and entered on a data extraction form which included reporting year, patients age, surgical specialty, American Society of Anesthesiologist (ASA) status, time of incident, phase and type of anesthesia and drug handling, type of error, class of medicine, level of harm, severity of adverse drug event (ADE) and steps taken for improvement. Total MEs reported were 311, medication errors were reported, 163 (52%) errors occurred in ASA II and 90 (29%) ASA III patient, and 133 (43%) during induction. During administration phase 60% MEs occurred and 65% were due to human error. ADEs were found in 86 (28%) reports, 58 of which were significant, 23 serious and five life-threatening errors. The majority of errors involved neuromuscular blockers (32%) and opioids (13%). Sharing of CI and a lesson to be learnt e-mail, colour coded labels, change in medication trolley lay out, decrease in floor stock and high alert labels were the low-cost steps taken to reduce incidents. Medication errors were more frequent during administration. ADEs were occurred in 28% MEs.

OSI Number – 21693

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