Demand and capacity to integrate pelvic organ prolapse and genital fistula services in low-resource settings.

Demand and capacity to integrate pelvic organ prolapse and genital fistula services in low-resource settings.

Journalinternational urogynaecology journal
Publication date – Oct – 2018
Authors – Tripathi V, Elneil S, Romanzi L
KeywordsGenital fistula, global surgery, Health systems research, Integration, Low-and middle-income countries, Pelvic organ prolapse
Open access – Yes
SpecialityObstetrics and Gynaecology
World region Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, South-eastern Asia, Southern Africa, Southern Asia, Western Africa
Country: Bangladesh, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Niger, Nigeria, Uganda
Language – English
Submitted to the One Surgery Index on October 25, 2018 at 8:48 pm
Abstract:

INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS:
There is a need for expanded access to safe surgical care in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) as illustrated by the report of the 2015 Lancet Commission on Global Surgery. Packages of closely-related surgical procedures may create platforms of capacity that maximize impact in LMIC. Pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and genital fistula care provide an example. Although POP affects many more women in LMICs than fistula, donor support for fistula treatment in LMICs has been underway for decades, whereas treatment for POP is usually limited to hysterectomy-based surgical treatment, occurring with little to no donor support. This capacity-building discrepancy has resulted in POP care that is often non-adherent to international standards and in non-integration of POP and fistula services, despite clear areas of similarity and overlap. The objective of this study was to assess the feasibility and potential value of integrating POP services at fistula centers.

METHODS:
Fistula repair sites supported by the Fistula Care Plus project were surveyed on current demand for and capacity to provide POP, in addition to perceptions about integrating POP and fistula repair services.

RESULTS:
Respondents from 26 hospitals in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia completed the survey. Most fistula centers (92%) reported demand for POP services, but many cannot meet this demand. Responses indicated a wide variation in assessment and grading practices for POP; approaches to lower urinary tract symptom evaluation; and surgical skills with regard to compartment-based POP, and urinary and rectal incontinence. Fistula surgeons identified integration synergies but also potential conflicts.

CONCLUSIONS:
Integration of genital fistula and POP services may enhance the quality of POP care while increasing the sustainability of fistula care.

OSI Number – 20257
PMID – 29411073

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