International Study of the Epidemiology of Paediatric Trauma: PAPSA Research Study.

International Study of the Epidemiology of Paediatric Trauma: PAPSA Research Study.

JournalWorld journal of surgery
Publication date – Jul – 2018
Authors – Catherine J. Bradshaw, Ashwath S. Bandi, Zahid Muktar, Muhammad A. Hasan, Tanvir K. Chowdhury, Tahmina Banu, Mesay Hailemariam, Florence Ngu, David Croaker, Rouma Bankolé, Tunde Sholadoye, Oluwole Olaomi, Emmanuel Ameh, Antonio Di Cesare, Ernesto Leva, Yona Ringo, Lukman Abdur-Rahman, Ramy Salama, Essam Elhalaby, Helen Perera, Christopher Parsons, Stewart Cleeve, Alp Numanoglu, Sebastian Van As, Shilpa Sharma, Kokila Lakhoo
KeywordsEpidemiology, paediatric trauma, prospective
Open access – Yes
SpecialityEmergency surgery, Paediatric surgery, Trauma and orthopaedic surgery
World region Australia and New Zealand, Eastern Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Southern Asia, Western Africa, Western Europe
Country: Australia, Bangladesh, Egypt, Ethiopia, India, Italy, Ivory Coast, Nigeria, South Africa, Tanzania, United Kingdom
Language – English
Submitted to the One Surgery Index on July 21, 2018 at 12:00 am
Abstract:

Objectives
Trauma is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The literature on paediatric trauma epidemiology in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) is limited. This study aims to gather epidemiological data on paediatric trauma.

Methods
This is a multicentre prospective cohort study of paediatric trauma admissions, over 1 month, from 15 paediatric surgery centres in 11 countries. Epidemiology, mechanism of injury, injuries sustained, management, morbidity and mortality data were recorded. Statistical analysis compared LMICs and high-income countries (HICs).

Results
There were 1377 paediatric trauma admissions over 31 days; 1295 admissions across ten LMIC centres and 84 admissions across five HIC centres. Median number of admissions per centre was 15 in HICs and 43 in LMICs. Mean age was 7 years, and 62% were boys. Common mechanisms included road traffic accidents (41%), falls (41%) and interpersonal violence (11%). Frequent injuries were lacerations, fractures, head injuries and burns. Intra-abdominal and intra-thoracic injuries accounted for 3 and 2% of injuries. The mechanisms and injuries sustained differed significantly between HICs and LMICs. Median length of stay was 1 day and 19% required an operative intervention; this did not differ significantly between HICs and LMICs. No mortality and morbidity was reported from HICs. In LMICs, in-hospital morbidity was 4.0% and mortality was 0.8%.

Conclusion
The spectrum of paediatric trauma varies significantly, with different injury mechanisms and patterns in LMICs. Healthcare structure, access to paediatric surgery and trauma prevention strategies may account for these differences. Trauma registries are needed in LMICs for future research and to inform local policy.

OSI Number – 10184
PMID – 29282513

Public annotations on this article:

You must be logged in to add comments

No public annotations yet