Developing a sustainable hip service in Cambodia

Developing a sustainable hip service in Cambodia

JournalHip International
Publication date – Sep – 2014
Authors – Holt JA, Aird JJ, Gollogly JG, Ngiep OC, Gollogly S
KeywordsArthroplasty, Hip, Prosthesis, Registy, total hip replacements
Open access – No
SpecialityTrauma and orthopaedic surgery
World region South-eastern Asia
Country: Cambodia
Language – English
Submitted to the One Surgery Index on June 29, 2018 at 12:29 pm
Abstract:

OBJECTIVE:
Initial report on establishment of a hip service in Phnom Penh, Cambodia at Children’s Surgical Centre. We describe indications for total hip replacement (THR) and initial results.

METHODS:
A database was established to collect data and track patients for follow up. Initial data collected included; diagnosis, implant used, post-operative complications. As the service developed, pre- and postoperative Harris hip scores were included.

RESULTS:
High rate of avascular necrosis (AVN) as the initial diagnosis. Five years post initiation of the hip service, 95 patients have received 116 THRs; including 10 revisions, 12 bilateral procedures. Complications/failures requiring revision involved four prosthetic femoral neck fractures, two aseptic acetabular component, two late infections, one instability. One failure, a periprosthetic acetabular fracture, required removal of all prosthetics. Complications not requiring revision, included three post-op foot drops, three superficial wound infections, one Vancouver B1 periprosthetic femur fracture. Average age was 41. Overall implant survival is 85% at three years.

DISCUSSION:
AVN was the most common indication for THR: many patients had a history of hip trauma, and/or prolonged steroids from traditional healers for pain. Problems with specific implants were addressed by the company. A different stem is now routinely used, no further fractures have been reported. Acetabular loosening, thought to be due to poor technique, has been addressed by focused training. Infection rate is monitored, and microbiology resources are improving.

CONCLUSION:
Developing an affordable hip arthroplasty service in a country like Cambodia is challenging. Developing a local registry has helped to identify complications and modify techniques.

OSI Number – 10005
PMID – 25044267

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